CropWeek 2010 – Why Independent Opener Systems Make Sense

I have seen some of my grandfather Mehalko’s old farming photos where they were seeding with twelve foot drills.  That twelve foot drill had a relatively inaccurate rate seeding tool and it was fairly difficult to manage depth.  All of this and not to mention the open cab.

I visited the SeedHawk booth to check out their independent opener system which comes in 84 feet of machine.  Just imagine 84 shanks, each moving independently depending on the topography of the terrain.  This is not just a machine for flat land, it can also be used on rolling topography.  I have heard many people say that there is not a more accurate tool for seeding canola than the SeedHawk.  It seems that larger farms are making sure they have the right seeder for the right situation. Farmers are using the Bourgault Paralink or SeedHawk for small seeds which require shallow depth planting.  They are then using disk and traditional shank seeders for pulses and cereals.  It all makes sense if you have the acres to justify the multiple pieces of machinery.

I talked to Chris Bettschen from SeedHawk, and asked him to explain to me why their product is becoming more popular and how it works.

Check out the Cropweek Tweets

Check out the CropWeek Photos

If you have a SeedHawk or have an opinion let me know what you think about it.  Like RTK and variable rate technology, this is all about farming in the most precise efficient manner possible.  Let me know if you want to have to worry about 84 feet of moving parts rolling through the field at 4 mph.  Its a lot of moving parts and seems like lots could go wrong but so far I have heard terrific feedback on the product.  What do you think?

 

Shaun Haney

Shaun grew up on a family seed farm in Southern Alberta. Haney Farms produces, conditions and retails wheat, barley, canola and corn seed. Shaun Haney is the founder of RealAgriculture.com. @shaunhaney

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One Comment

Chris

The video will not play.

I’ve tried it on Combine forums, here and on you tube, none work. Please check into.

Thanks

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