Weather Outlook For Canada – David Phillips – Environment Canada

Is there anything that occupies more time in discussions for farmers than the weather.  Farmers depend on the weather.  It either makes us or breaks us in most years.  It is not only the amount of heat or moisture that we get but also the timing that is just as important.  Look at this weeks freak snow storm in the Lethbridge area.  At the end of last week many farmers were saying that they needed more moisture and boy did they get it on Tuesday (see picture above).  Not only was the amount of moisture important but also the timing which was just before much of the seeding got underway.

With so much of the farmers livelihood depending on the weather and seeding just beginning, I thought it would be great timing to talk to David Phillips from Environment Canada about what Canadian farmers can expect this summer with the weather.  David addresses the moisture opportunities and temperature outlook.

David Phillips (Environment Canada) Discusses the Weather Outlook for Spring and Summer of 2010 in Canada
[audio:http://realagriculture.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/David-Phillips-April-15-2010.mp3]

One of the interesting things David mentions in the interview is that there is no truth to the relationship of fog and rain ninety days later.  David told me that there is no connection between fog today and it raining ninety days from now.  Some years it may happen purely by coincidence and has nothing to do with science.

 

Shaun Haney

Shaun grew up on a family seed farm in Southern Alberta. Haney Farms produces, conditions and retails wheat, barley, canola and corn seed. Shaun Haney is the founder of RealAgriculture.com. @shaunhaney

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