Why Do You Love to Grow Wheat?

Wheat is grown on more acres than any other crop around the world.  There is a wheat harvest happening somewhere in the world every month.  Having said all of that If I asked you, “Why do you grow wheat,” do you know what your answer would be?

Some people want you to believe that farmer’s grow wheat because they are feeding the world.  I think that is much to deep for the most of us when trying to plot a crop plan.  How often do you say to yourself….. I am going to increase my wheat acres because I want to feed more people.”  In my opinion the “feeding the world” notion is more of the agricultural industry trying to justify its existence in the US with ethanol subsidies or the battle versus urban ignorance to agriculture. The notion of feeding the world is the results but I really don’t think farmers consider this as much as some people would like you to believe.

I believe that farmers grow wheat because it is a great rotational crop that is adaptive to many different climates, is very close to end use staples like bread and flour and also makes farmers more money than some other cropping options.

Ask yourself why do you grow wheat and vote in our poll below. If you cannot see the poll, CLICK HERE.

 

Shaun Haney

Shaun Haney is the founder of RealAgriculture.com. He creates content regularly and hosts RealAg Radio on Rural Radio 147 every weekday at 4:30 PM est. @shaunhaney

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One Comment

Aaron

Personally I hate growing wheat. It is the least profitable crop we grow on our farm and the only reason we grow any at all is rotation. With that said if we could get the Ontario or US wheat prices it would be completely different. We grow less than 25% of our acres to wheat and if the CWB sticks around it will be 0% starting the year after next. Feeding the world and 2000 CWB employees means nothing to me when I can’t make enough money growing it to feed my own family.

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