Canola School: The Impact of Tight Canola Rotations

The economic sway of canola is visibly obvious across the West. A flyover of the prairies in the summer would show you what looks to be a sea of yellow. That sea of yellow shows you just how profitable canola is. The fact that aerial view doesn’t change much from year to year reinforces just how profitable it is. The simple fact is that the economic benefits of canola are causing producers to shorten their rotations. Where traditionally producers would break for anywhere from 2 to 4 years, data is showing that a large number of producers are shortening those rotations to 1 year or even going from canola on canola in some cases.

In the past, the yield penalty for those tight rotations would be a deterrent, but now the economics are overriding that deterrent. While it is understandable, it does come with some concerns and some considerations.  With Western Canada expected to plant close to 20 million acres in 2012, there is a growing cause for concern.

SEE MORE CANOLA SCHOOL EPISODES.

Murray Hartman is an oilseed specialist with Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development. Murray spoke to producers about the concerns and the impact that come along with shorter canola rotations. I spoke to him at FarmTech 2012 in Edmonton, Alberta.

If you cannot see the embedded video below click here.

 

Shaun Haney

Shaun Haney is the founder of RealAgriculture.com. He creates content regularly and hosts RealAg Radio on Rural Radio 147 every weekday at 4:30 PM est. @shaunhaney

Trending

Wheat prices jump into August — This week in the grain markets

This week, winter wheat prices touched a three-year high, but it didn’t last. Chicago SRW wheat prices for September 2018 gained 5 per cent or about 26 cents US/bushel to close at $5.56. While the December 2018 contract was up 5.4 percent — or nearly 30 cents — to finish a tad under $5.80. In…Read more »

Related

Leave a Reply

 

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.