AgNerds Ep 14 – Twitter VS Armyworm

It’s always a good thing when you see social media being used in a helpful and constructive way. It’s not that a picture of a bacon sundae isn’t important to share with the world, it’s just that there may be a slightly more beneficial way to utilize the camera on your mobile phone. Take for instance the recent infestation of armyworms around parts of Ontario. In this case, Twitter proved to be a very valuable tool. Not only were farmers able to alert their neighbours about the presence of armyworms in their fields, they were also able to share information about how to identify them, when to spray them and what to spray them with.

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In this episode of AgNerds, Shaun and Pete discuss how specifically Twitter was used to help put the boot to the armyworm and how producers can use search within Twitter to help them find information that can benefit them in similar situations.

If you cannot see the embedded video below click here.

 

Shaun Haney

Shaun grew up on a family seed farm in Southern Alberta. Haney Farms produces, conditions and retails wheat, barley, canola and corn seed. Shaun Haney is the founder of RealAgriculture.com. @shaunhaney

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2 Comments

Philip Shaw

Don’t you think Twitter added to #Armyworm hystery….I’m a heavy user of Twitter, saw all the buzz about armyworm, went to my fields several times, and they were below threshold. I was told by my crop guy how many fields had been sprayed. Then the army worms disappeared completely. So did Twitter help..or did it create an emotional environment where many fields were sprayed which didn’t need to be. I think its a question of balance. I think that Twitter may have created a herd environment where it seemed everybody was spraying when they weren’t. The true power of twitter is engaging each other. If you don’t engage others, you are not getting the true value of Twitter. You are falling behind. So when soybean aphids come, remember, Twitter can create soybean aphid hystery. We don’t want to go there.

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Wayne Black

While I do agree with Phil’s comment to a point, it all comes back to making the right decision for your crop & your farm. Twitter did help to raise awareness of armyworm in Ontario which is what it’s goal should be – raise awareness.
I think Peter should change his comment from one of wondering if Twitter is an effective tool for farmers to “knowing” that it is an effective tool for agriculture. So many great stories of immediate awareness because if Twitter.
Great video guys! Keep talking about getting people to use hashtags to make the tweets searchable.

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