The Monosem Vacuum Planter Provides Accuracy for Canola Growers

Monosem describes its vacuum planter as a premium product. That may be something every manufacturer describes their product as, but not every manufacturer can live up to the hype. Just looking at the Monosem planter, you can see that it is a very solidly built, durable machine. Every component that goes into the planter reflects that. It is also a very accurate machine. It has the ability to singulate something as small as canola seed and plant it at extremely precise populations giving producers a greater degree of control at planting.


I looked over some of the features of the Monosem Vacuum Planter at Farm Progress 2012 with help from Monosem Territory Sales Manager Brian Sieker.

If you cannot see the embedded video below click here.


Shaun Haney

Shaun Haney is the founder of He creates content regularly and hosts RealAg Radio on Rural Radio 147 every weekday at 4PM est. @shaunhaney


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mercadeo en linea

As for planting vegetable crops, you should be able to transplant or direct seed into the system depending on what you want to plant and what cover crops you have available to you. For example we are direct seeding pumpkins into hairy vetch. You could also direct seed cucumbers or squash the same way. Small seeded plants like lettuce or carrots would be much more difficult but not impossible (lettuce plugs or seedlings are probably the way to go). If you have a more sophisticated planter, like a Monosem no-till vacuum planter you could get the seeds in the ground, but getting them up through the mulch of the rolled cover crop may be tough (that’s something we’ve never tried). Ron Morse, PhD, at Virginia Tech has done quite a bit of no-till veggies into cover crops as has Jeff Mitchell, PhD, at the University of California, Davis. Both of these researchers and several farmer co-operators are successfully no-till transplanting crops like tomato, eggplant, cabbage, etc., into these systems.


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