Beef Research School: E-Beam Irradiation’s Role in Food Safety

Food safety is top of mind for any food industry. The beef industry is constantly researching new and proven methods for keeping Canada’s beef value chain safe from pathogens. E-beam irradiation, a food safety technique used in over 50 countries, is one such method being evaluated for use on beef and beef trim. While not currently approved for use on beef in Canada, irradiation is approved for use on other foods, such as spices and potatoes.

Dr. Rick Holley at the University of Manitoba recently wrapped a research project evaluating the efficacy on beef trim of E-beam irradiation at very low doses. In this Beef Research School, Dr. Holley explains how E-beam irradiation works, its efficacy on several strains of virulent E. coli and salmonella and the safety of the technique.

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2 Comments

Tracy

Hi Wayne,

Low-dose e-beam irradiation extends shelf-life of trim by a couple of days, but there are many things that influence shelf-life beyond the treatment.

Regards,

Tracy Sakatch
Beef Cattle Research Council
http://www.BeefResearch.ca

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