Canola School: Measuring Seed Damage with a Simple Test

Most seasoned canola growers know a staggering amount of canola seed never becomes a viable plant, and it’s not due to disease or poor germ. An unfortunate side effect of running an air drill is, well, air, or rather the damage that air can do to tiny canola seed as it pushes it through the hoses and down to the openers. Excessive seed damage can have a huge impact on stand establishment.

How do you measure seed damage? There’s a relatively easy way to tell, and that’s with the easy, economical sock test. In this video, Shawn Senko, agronomy specialist with the Canola Council of Canada, demonstrates how to set up your drill to gauge seed damage, where the damage may be occurring, what to look for and how to change your seeder settings to minimize this loss.

For more on seeder set up and maintenance, click here.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE CANOLA SCHOOL VIDEOS.

If you cannot see the embedded video, click here.

 

RealAgriculture Agronomy Team

A team effort of RealAgriculture videographers and editorial staff to make sure that you have the latest in agronomy information for your farm.

Trending

Wheat prices jump into August — This week in the grain markets

This week, winter wheat prices touched a three-year high, but it didn’t last. Chicago SRW wheat prices for September 2018 gained 5 per cent or about 26 cents US/bushel to close at $5.56. While the December 2018 contract was up 5.4 percent — or nearly 30 cents — to finish a tad under $5.80. In…Read more »

Related

Leave a Reply

 

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.