Canola School: Scouting for Diamondback Moth & How to Tell all the Green Worms Apart

Unlike bertha armyworm, which is discussed here, diamondback moths are quite small and are carried on winds that come up from the south. This makes monitoring and scouting for the pest somewhat more difficult than others, as pests that overwinter have a more easily anticipated emergence timeline.

Beyond monitoring, there are some very telling ways to scout for diamondback moth — a moth whose larvae could be mistaken for bertha armyworm or alfalfa looper. In this episode of the Canola School, John Gavloski, provincial entomologist with Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Intiatives, shows us how to scout for diamondback moth and how to identify the pests conclusively.

For more on economic thresholds of the pest, click here.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE CANOLA SCHOOL EPISODES.

If you cannot see the embedded video, click here.

 

RealAgriculture Agronomy Team

A team effort of RealAgriculture videographers and editorial staff to make sure that you have the latest in agronomy information for your farm.


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