Horsch Anderson Sprinter Drill Offers Simple, Low Maintenance Design

Working on engineering an existing product sometimes makes it better, but can add a layer of complexity that requires more work and maintenance. In short, simple can sometimes be better, especially when it comes to upkeep and maintenance.

With that in mind, Horsch Anderson recently rolled out its simplified, independent depth control drill — the Sprinter. Jeremy Hughes, sales manager for Horsch Anderson, took RealAgriculture.com on a tour of the Sprinter drill to highlight how the drill works to compensate for variable terrain and why you’ll save hours in maintenance on the machine.

Hughes explains that unlike some other independent depth control drills, the Sprinter is not overly complicated, with just two cylinders per wing that roll a rock shaft, which moves a torsion bar that works to hold openers in the ground. On a 64-foot drill with 12-inch spacing there are just 10 cylinders vs 64, allowing for a quicker response shank time on variable terrain. All bearings are oil filled, as well, meaning maintenance on this high air capacity drill is straightforward and fast.

If you cannot see the embedded video, click here.

 

RealAgriculture News Team

A team effort of RealAgriculture's videographers and editorial staff to make sure that you have the latest in what is happening in agriculture.

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