Wheat School: Identifying Spray Inversion Risks & How to Avoid Drift

Debra Murphy, 2013

When it comes to spraying, earlier in the day is always better, right? Well, no. And that’s because of a often misunderstood or unknown atmospheric condition known as an inversion.

Inversions happen in the absence of sunlight, and can cause disastrous spray drift issues if farmers are spraying in them. It’s not a simple concept to explain, but, in this somewhat lengthy Wheat School episode, Tom Wolf, spray application specialist does just that. Watch the video to learn more about how the soil and air masses warm throughout the day, why wind isn’t always a bad thing and how calm air can still carry risks of drift occurring.

CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE WHEAT SCHOOL EPISODES FEATURING TOM WOLF.

If you cannot see the embedded video, click here.

 

 

RealAgriculture Agronomy Team

A team effort of RealAgriculture videographers and editorial staff to make sure that you have the latest in agronomy information for your farm.

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