Till-N-Plant Offers Strip-Tillage, Fertilizer Application & Planting in One Pass

As corn and soybeans move west and north through the prairies, the interest in equipment that departs from the typical drill grows substantially. As western Canadian farmers are learning, it’s not just the planter that makes a big difference to corn yields; seed bed prep and fertilizer placement can be much different versus these same tasks for small grains, like wheat and barley.

A compaction, or plow-pan, layer three to four inches below the surface can significantly impact corn root development and impacts water infiltration, too. The TIll-N-Plant is one set up that’s designed to open the furrow, perform a strip-till operation, drop fertilizer and, with the addition of a planter on the back, can even get all this done in one pass.

See more: Check out the RealAgriculture video library on planters here

In this video, Kellen Huber of Tri Star Farm Services Ltd., explains the Till-N-Plant’s set up and features to RealAgriculture field editor, Debra Murphy. From its 4″ to 16″ deep strip-till capability, to its residue cleaners and rollers, the Till-N-Plant works in an eight-inch zone on 30″ row spacing to create a compaction-free, well-infiltrated root zone.

Huber covers the hydraulic and horsepower needs of the Till-N-Plant, widths offered and more in this video filmed at this year’s Canadian Western Agribition.

If you cannot see the embedded video, click here.

 

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One Comment

Jim Boak

Actually – the planter hype is somewhat misplaced… We all tend to forget or overlook the fact that the planter research is based on wide rows and takes into account the yield limiting factors common to the central corn belt in the US.
Plants don’t like to grow tightly packed in rows. We like our plants growing in rows – makes mechanical management easier. If we can just get past box we are thinking in we will find that we can grow a lot more with a lot less.

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