52 by 2025: Canola Council of Canada Announces New Targets

January 9, 2014 – The Canola Council of Canada (CCC) announced its new target for Canada’s canola industry earlier today, in Winnipeg, Manitoba. The CCC aims to increase the demand for canola, create a stable and open trade environment and sustainably and profitably increase production of canola to 26M tonnes by 2025.

The CCC’s new targets have been set before the end of the last ten year plan, Growing Great 2015.

terry youzwa
“First,” explained Terry Youzwa, chairman of the CCC Board of Directors, “it’s because the industry has exceeded the targets set in Growing Great 2015 well ahead of schedule…. It’s also in fact, mainly, about the growing world demand for healthy oil and high quality protein to meet global needs.”

The CCC explained that its goal of 26M tonnes of Canadian canola will be achieved by increasing yield to an average of 52 bu/ac on 22M acres.

Oil quality improvements, according to the Strategic Plan published in conjunction with this announcement, will be measured by: decreasing saturated fat content to 7% or lower, increasing protein availability and attracting high oleic and specialty oils to 1/3 of Canada’s canola acres by 2025.

You can find the Canola Council of Canada’s Strategic Plan on their website: http://keepitcoming.ca

The strategic plan also outlines positive trade goals (including: “No trade impediments resulting from non-science based regulation”), increases in canola’s vegetable oil share and the goal of narrowing the value gap between canola oil and meal.

According to Youwza, canola generates 19.3B annually in economic activity in Canada and nearly a quarter of a million jobs.

 

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5 Comments

Kevin Serfas

We can’t move the 15mmt we have in 2013. There needs to be a pile of money put into figuring out what to do with another 11mmt in the next 12 years. And the infrastructure to move it.

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Shaun Haney

Based on some of the comments I have seen so far I think many farmers have some of the same thoughts. We obviously need to open up more marketing opportunities first. Thanks for the comment.

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Rick Taillieu

that question was asked at the presser today. Setting long term goals should encourage investment and planning. Even without a formal goal, production will keep increasing with genetics and management – hopefully this is call to action. There was pile of investment into crush capacity made over the last decade… with strong demand it will trigger more. The new canola crush plant in Camrose, plus capacity increases at other crushers is a good start. More details on the CCC plan at http://keepitcoming.ca

Bill

Another concern i have is the amount of land needed for canola for this to be a reality. We already see farmers (ourselves included) that are pushing 1 yr canola, one year wheat rotations, and the disease problems are huge in this system when it gets a bit wet. What will we need to do to achieve so much extra tonnage? I don’t think it is a responsible thing to be doing, nor is it viable

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ricktaillieu

Just read CP CEO Hunter Harrison’s open letter “Setting the record straight: On Canadian Pacific’s rail operations in the harshest winter in 60 years”

The fifth paragraph reads: “Distinct from operating conditions, Western Canadian farmers last year produced an extraordinary grain crop of 80 million metric tonnes (MMT), 27% above the previous 2008/09 record and 37% above the five year average. This increase was not forecasted by anyone, including grain growers themselves.”

Well, Mr. Harrison – are you prepared fro the increased production that is being projected for canola in the next 12 years? I’m also pretty sure that farmers will continue to increase yields in other commodities such as wheat and pulse crops.

Consider yourself notified of the increase.

Here is the letter: http://cpr.ca/en/in-your-community/Pages/Setting-the-record-straight.aspx

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