Dr. Lloyd Dosdall – The Passing of a Truly Great Professor and Researcher

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Dr. Lloyd Dosdall the day we met in 2010

With great sadness I found out this morning that Dr. Lloyd Dosdall has passed away after a long battle with cancer.

See Dr. Dosdall’s bio on the University of Alberta’s website

I remember back in July 2010 when I first met Dr. Lloyd Dosdall. It was at the Farming Smarter site on the east side of Lethbridge. He knew me as “the young guy with the camera” and I knew him as “the really smart bug guy.”  As we discussed the video that we were about to film Dr. Dosdall admitted to me that extension work was changing.  He congratulated me on allowing people like him to communicate to growers through video on demand.  He said that it was making information more accessible and making his research more effective.

When we finished shooting the two videos he was so concerned about how well he did and whether we should do a re-shoot.  Here was a guy that had to make the 5 hour drive home immediately afterwards and was more concerned about the quality of the piece and whether I was happy.  To me this is the kind of guy that Dr. Dosdall was.  He was so considerate and accommodating.

Here is the video Lloyd and I shot that day in July 2010. 

To me, Dr. Dosdall was a soft-spoken very intelligent entomologist who had time for anyone in the industry.    His work in the area of beneficial insects was his flagship to be remembered by canola growers as long as there is canola in Western Canada.

— Alberta Canola (@AlbertaCanola) June 12, 2014

In 2010 Dr. Dosdall was awarded the very prestigious ASTech award.  The video below  summarizes his career that was shown at the award ceremony.

If you cannot see the above embedded video, CLICK HERE to see this great dedication to the career of Dr. Lloyd Dosdall.

Today we lost one of the great guys.  Please take sometime today to think about how Dr. Dosdall impacted your perception of insects, your canola crop and your life in general as a friend.

Thank you for being you Dr. Dosdall.

 

Shaun Haney

Shaun Haney is the founder of RealAgriculture.com. He creates content regularly and hosts RealAg Radio on Rural Radio 147 every weekday at 4PM est.

@shaunhaney

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4 Comments

ricktaillieu

Very few people in agriculture will leave a legacy as great as Lloyd.

Its is not uncommon at a crop walk or a meeting to hear a voice in the crowd ask “what about the beneficials?”

It was Dr. Dosdall. who was among the first to ask that question and then use his skill as a research scientist and his gifts as an educator to make Western Canadian agriculture aware of the “good bugs” in our cropping system.

I like, many I have spoken with today, share the same memories of Lloyd. You remember the first time you met him and the last time you saw him. He made everyone feel important, made answering their questions a priority and made your place in agriculture feel valuable. And after he gave so generously of his time and shared his incredible knowledge… he would thank you for your time.

That was Lloyd. A truly remarkable man that I was humbled to call a colleague and honoured to call a friend.

Rick Taillieu
Alberta Canola Producers Commission

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Diogenes the Cynic

Well said, Rick. Truly one of the Shining Stars of Canadian Agriculture.

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Colin Rice

Dr. Dosdall was my one of my favourite professors at U of A and the most amazing teacher I have ever had. He will be missed.

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Neil Harker

It is difficult to lose such a great friend and colleague as Lloyd Dosdall.

Lloyd was always a gentleman. He put others before himself.

His positive impact in integrated cropping systems research will be felt and appreciated for many years. Lloyd initiated much of the interest and current research on beneficial insects in western Canadian agriculture.

Whether on the phone, in the field, at a conference, in a student committee, or over a meal, it was always a pleasure to visit with Lloyd. He made me feel that my interests and priorities were crucial.

Lloyd’s passion for entomology was contagious. Much of what I have learned about insects is due to Lloyd’s great teaching ability; he had a way of captivating my interest whenever he talked about insects.

Lloyd’s leadership, as well as his kind and considerate manner, will be deeply missed. I have been greatly blessed by his friendship.

K. Neil Harker
Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada

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