Canola School: A Prairie Swede Midge Update

Since being found in Ontario in 2000, swede midge has had a rather hasty spread, with adults being found as early as 2007 in some areas in Saskatchewan. Until the past couple of years, however, western Canadian farmers reported finding few symptoms of swede midge damage, which can include anything from fused flower petals to a “witch’s broom” appearance of the main stem. The severity of yield loss depends largely on insect numbers and what stage the crop is at when affected. Swede midge can be devastating to pre-bolting canola, but cause little damage to crops in full flower. Areas in Ontario under high pressure of the midge have essentially stopped growing canola because of this pest.

Learn More: Scouting, life cycle and control of swede midge

This year, pheromone traps are providing surveillance across the western provinces and in this video, Julie Soroka, research scientist with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, provides an update on the numbers of swede midge being found in these traps. Soroka also discusses ways to manage crops to avoid swede midge damage, adding that the surveillance project will continue into next year.

Check this video out as a larger version or download the audio from Soundcloud!

 

RealAgriculture Agronomy Team

A team effort of RealAgriculture videographers and editorial staff to make sure that you have the latest in agronomy information for your farm.

Trending

Wheat prices jump into August — This week in the grain markets

This week, winter wheat prices touched a three-year high, but it didn’t last. Chicago SRW wheat prices for September 2018 gained 5 per cent or about 26 cents US/bushel to close at $5.56. While the December 2018 contract was up 5.4 percent — or nearly 30 cents — to finish a tad under $5.80. In…Read more »

Related

Leave a Reply

 

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.