Month: July 2015

CWB Name Becomes History as G3 Canada Launches

First its monopoly was removed, and now the name will be history too. The Canadian Wheat Board (or CWB) formally became a private grain company known as “G3 Canada” today. G3 Global Grain Group — the joint venture between Bunge and the Saudi Agriculture and Livestock Investment Company — completed the $250 million acquisition of a… Read more »

Rough Waters — A Choppy Ride for the End-of-Crop-Year Grain Markets

Grain trade this week was quite choppy as the usual suspects of weather, currency swings, and #harvest15 firing up being exacerbated by the closing of the month of July (meaning funds and other speculators may have looked to clean up their books a bit). Monday might’ve been the worst as front-month contracts for soybeans and… Read more »

Agronomy Geeks Ontario, Ep.18 — The Corn Stalk/White Mould Connection: What’s a Farmer to Do?

We’re moving into prime white mould season — mid-summer and into August. While conditions were very favourable for disease development through June (wet and cool), mid-to-late July’s heat and dry conditions could have slowed progress of the disease. While you won’t be able to gauge infection levels in soybeans without scouting (hint: go do that… Read more »

Pacific Coast Canola Defaults; Legumex Walker Not Expecting Special Crops Business to be Affected

Lenders have come calling for Legumex Walker Inc.’s canola processing business. According to a statement from the company, Pacific Coast Canola has defaulted on its loans, owing an estimated US$54.6 million. AgCountry Farm Credit Services, which represents a syndicate of lenders under PCC’s senior credit facility, has served notice demanding the repayment of all amounts… Read more »

$25 Million “Livestock and Forage Centre of Excellence” to be Built in Saskatchewan

Plans and funding for a $25 million “Livestock and Forage Centre of Excellence” were announced at the University of Saskatchewan on Thursday. Federal Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz and Saskatchewan ag minister Lyle Stewart were in Saskatoon to announce $10 million in funding for the centre under Growing Forward 2. The U of S has committed $7 million for… Read more »

TWORA — TPP Talks, Finding Feed and Early Harvest — July 30

From the Trans-Pacific trade negotiations in Hawaii to feeding canola to cattle to wild weather — here’s this week’s agriculture news highlights, summed up in less than 20 minutes: Poll: Should Canada Join the TPP if the Cost is Supply Management? Subscribe: iTunes | Android | RSS

Beef Market Update: Keeping a Watchful Eye on the U.S. Herd Expansion

It’s tough to talk about the cattle markets and not focus solely on the demand side which, if we’re being honest, has been nothing short of impressive. But price is a function of two components — supply being the balance to demand. While Canada’s beef herd continues to contract, ranchers in the United States have… Read more »

Advisory Group Named for Advancing Women in Agriculture Project

The Canadian Agricultural Human Resource Council (CAHRC) announced this week the list of individuals who now form the advisory group for the Supporting the Advancement of Women in Agriculture project. The project, funded through the Status of Women Canada, will “examine and address critical barriers to advancement facing women in the industry.” From there, the… Read more »

Wheat School: Understanding Varietal Differences in Phosphorus Removal

Not all wheat varieties are created equally when it comes to the amount of phosphorus they remove from the soil. Some varieties are efficient, while others are phosphorus hogs, explains Jay Goos, soil scientist at North Dakota State University, in this instalment of the Wheat School. So why does this matter? “The reasons I’m concerned about… Read more »

29 Wheat Varieties to be Moved Out of CWRS and CPSR Classes in 2017

The Canadian Grain Commission has announced 29 varieties of Canada Western Red Spring and Canada Prairie Spring Red wheat will be moved to a different wheat class on August 1st, 2017. The reclassification follows a revision of the quality parameters for the CWRS and CPSR classes by the Prairie Grain Development Committee earlier this year…. Read more »

Wheat Pete’s Word, July 29: Corn Pollination Problems, Aphids Exceeding Thresholds & Post-Wheat Weed Control

Can you hear that? That’s the sound of corn growing fast. In fact, parts of Ontario are on track to break heat records this week. What does this mean for the corn and soybean crop yields? That depends. Peter Johnson kicks off this week’s Word with a full report on corn pollination pitfalls — could… Read more »

Applications Open for Second Annual Farm Business Scholarship

The second annual Robert (Bob) L. Ross scholarship program is now accepting applications. The scholarship is offered by Agri-Food Management Excellence (AME) in collaboration with Farm Management Canada, Family Farms Group and the Ross Family. Applications must be received by September 15, 2015 The successful recipient will receive free tuition to the CTEAM (Canadian Total… Read more »

Salford Adds the I-4200 to its Independent Tillage Series

Salford introduced two new vertical tillage units in June, just in time for Canada’s Farm Progress Show: the I-2200 and the I-4200, both part of the “independent” series.  The latter of the two, the hybrid I-4200, was also on display at Ag in Motion last week. The I-4200 retains a lot of the same design… Read more »

Canadian Universities Receive $1.4 Million to Process NASA Soil Data

Five Canadian universities are receiving $1.4 million in grants from the Canadian Space Agency to analyze soil moisture information collected by NASA’s Soil and Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite. The funding for Université de Sherbrooke, the University of Guelph, the University of Manitoba, the University of Toronto, and l’Institut national de la recherche scientifique was announced… Read more »

Soybean School West: Testing the Belief that Black Soil is Best for Planting Soybeans

Preliminary research conducted in southern Manitoba is casting some doubt on the common belief that dark, tilled soil is best for planting soybeans in northern growing regions. Greg Bartley, a graduate student working together with Dr. Yvonne Lawley at the University of Manitoba, is in his second year of comparing how soybeans respond when planted into different… Read more »