Canola School: Harvest Management — It’s Not All or Nothing

In recent years, the conversation around harvest management has heated up, with the inclusion of a debate that centres around straight cutting versus swathing. But, says RealAgriculture’s Shaun Haney, “debate is the wrong word.”

“We get trapped into this all or nothing scenario — it’s sort of like tillage versus no-till — right? You’re either one or you’re the other. And really, maybe that’s the wrong way to look at it.”

Angela Brackenreed, agronomy specialist with the Canola Council of Canada, agrees — it’s not necessarily about selling the swather.

“If producers can incorporate some straight-cutting with their swathing,” Brackenreed says in the following video, “it’s going to be economically in their favour.”

Angela Brackenreed, in conversation with Shaun Haney at the Canola Discovery Forum in Canmore. The duo talk harvest management, straight cutting (or not) and research into header choices.

Brackenreed says a producer’s first experience with straight-cutting can provoke strong reactions (perhaps leading to that all-or-nothing belief). And there are certainly a few things to get used to.

“I think the big surprise for a lot of producers is how green the stalk material can be when that grain is dry.”

But, she says, speaking of her own experience, give yourself a little extra time and you’ll get used to the intricacies of straight-cutting.

Related:

Canola School: Preparing to Straight-Cut, then Swathing Too
Canola School: Combine Speed, Header Choice & Harvest Tips to Minimize Losses

 

RealAgriculture Agronomy Team

A team effort of RealAgriculture videographers and editorial staff to make sure that you have the latest in agronomy information for your farm.

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