Darling Becomes President of Canadian Cattlemen’s Association

A cow-calf producer from apple country in southeastern Ontario is the new president of the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association.

Dan Darling and David Haywood-Farmer of BC were elected by acclamation as president and vice president, respectively, at the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association’s annual general meeting in Ottawa this past weekend.

Darling, who served as vice president for the last two years, replaces Dave Solverson of Camrose, Alberta. Solverson led the CCA through the conclusion of the repeal of U.S. mandatory country of origin labeling (COOL) — which cost the CCA nearly $4 million in legal fees — and the negotiations surrounding the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

Dan Darling (courtesy CCA)

Dan Darling (courtesy CCA)

Darling says his top trade priorities are achieving a bilateral trade deal with Japan, access for beef from animals over 30 months of age with Mexico, and resolution of technical barriers that have prevented the European Union from approving Canada’s main packing plants to export to the EU.

“The CCA is well-respected and has earned its reputation as an organization of influence because of the good work they do,” Darling said in a statement. “I am truly honoured to take on the role of CCA President and will continue to focus on achieving excellence in all files and to represent the best interests of beef producers across Canada.”

Darling and his brother Van operate a 250 cow operation and background calves on 1,500 acres in the Township of Cramahe of Northumberland County. He’s the past-president of Beef Farmers of Ontario.

Haywood-Farmer is a third generation rancher from Savona, B.C. and former president of the BC Cattlemen’s Association.

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