Wheat Pete's Word, Nov. 30: Winter Learning, Thick Wheat Stands & Clover, & Performance Trials

Episodes:

If your wheat stand looks more like a golf green than a cereal crop, should you still put down clover early in the spring? And why the push for longer season varieties? Yes, it’s time for Wheat Pete’s Word here at RealAgriculture, and Peter Johnson has a fact-ion (see what we did there?) packed podcast for you.

If you were hoping to attend the Southwest Agriculture Conference in early January as a kick-off to the winter learning season too bad, so sad, as it’s sold out, but Johnson does explain how to get logged in to watch remotely, plus mentions a few other events that are good to have on the calendar.

From there Wheat Pete tackles one of the best test for soil health (it’s actually not a test at all), talks turkey on soybean prices (and corrections), and gives a great analysis of what you will (and won’t) find in the GoCereals.ca performance trials.

Summary continues below…

If you have a question for Wheat Pete, call 1-844-540-2014, send him a tweet (@wheatpete), or email him at [email protected].

Summary

Wheat:

  • Spring cereal numbers are in! Visit gocereals.ca for all the data.
  • Maturity vs. yield — push it to the limit?
  • Choosing maturity post-beans (and vice versa for soybean maturities)
  • Seeding depth: why crown root depth matters so much (spoiler alert: there are, like, 43 reasons)

Corn: 

  • Long-season cautions? If you remember 1992, post volcano eruption, you remember we had no summer. When corn was harvested in winter/spring of ’93, bushel weights were super light. (42 lb per bushel vs 56).  But remember, since 1970 we’ve gained 2.5 days/decade on average. Push!
  • High Vomitoxin in corn is not because of August rain. Western Bean Cutworm and late silking are to blame
  • Variable rate results: high population in high yield areas and adjusted population for low yield areas led to some outstanding results in the Ottawa Valley (one of the nicest places to farm in Ontario, says Lyndsey)

Soybeans: 

 

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