White Planters unveils two new tracked options

More acres in a day, less compaction, and more no-till options are what planter customers want, says AGCO Corporation, and so the company has unveiled two new White Planters options to meet these needs.

The two new planter models —White Planters WP9924VE planter with tracks and WP9222VE wing-fold planter — were introduced at the 2018 National Farm Machinery Show at Louisville, Kentucky.

RealAgriculture’s Bernard Tobin caught up with Tom Draper, of AGCO, to talk about the new units, in what the company is calling the “next phase in White Planters’ VE planter Series featuring Precision Planting technology.”

In the video below, Draper takes us through the White Planters 9924VE model, with its 24-row, 30-inch large-frame and 150-bushel, dual tank, central-fill system. The unit rides on a 67-inch long tracks and is available in 25-inch or 30-inch widths for extra flotation. Farmers can expect to plant about 300 acres before needing to refill, says Draper, using the vSet meter, vDrive electronic drive system and integrated 20/20 SeedSense monitoring from Precision Planting.

SpeedTube and DeltaForce automated downforce are available as factory-installed options.

Details continue below interview

The WP9222 wing-fold planter now has added Precision Planting technology, offering precise seed placement for no-till planting.

The WP9222VE planter has vSet meters, the vDrive system, 20/20 monitoring and is available in a 12-row, 30-inch configuration. This flex-frame design makes it easy to add row-unit-mounted tillage coulters to cut residue and prepare the seed zone ahead of double disc openers. The planter is built with extra strength in the wing pivot joint and linkage to handle punishing no-till conditions, AGCO says. It also offers liquid fertilizer options with frame-mounted fertilizer openers.

Click here for more National Farm Machinery Show coverage.

 

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