GSI expands Quiet portable dryer offering

Grain Systems, Inc (GSI) is rolling out two new extensions of its Quiet Dryer technology.

GSI’s Quiet Dryer fan design was introduced in 2017 in an all-heat portable dryer. The company says it provides a 50 percent noise reduction compared to standard portable grain dryers equipped with vane axial fans without sacrificing drying capacity or efficiency.

For the 2018 harvest season, the technology will be offered as an option on two additional GSI dryer models that were featured at the National Farm Machinery Show last month in Louisville, Kentucky.

In this video, GSI’s grain conditioning engineering manager Jarod Wendt explains how the technology has been incorporated into the dryers. He says a Dry/Cool dryer incorporates Quiet Dryer technology into a portable dryer that heats grain in the top two-thirds of the unit to reduce moisture and cools it in the bottom one-third. It features a single blower and two plenums, available in either a 60/40 or 50/50 split.

This design allows for airflow to be optimized in both the upper and lower plenums, which maximizes capacity while also providing flexibility to be operated in any mode – all heat, dry and cool, continuous flow or batch – at a competitive price compared to standard portable dryers.

A second unit – GSI’s TopDry – combines a highly efficient grain dryer with capacities up to 2,100 bushels per hour at 5-point removal. It can also provide long-term grain storage for up to 32,500 bushels as an added benefit. Grain flows into a heating chamber at the top of the TopDry bin, and when dried, it is released into the holding area below for storage. In addition to now incorporating Quiet Dryer technology, other enhancements include improved plenum and grain temperature sensors, as well as new programmable logic controller (PLC) batch controls.

Click here for more National Farm Machinery Show coverage.

 

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