Putting yourself out there — ag policy and the under 40 crowd

Time away from the farm is important for so many reasons, even if it can be a challenge to make it work. Whether it’s continuing your education, getting some much needed downtime, or speaking up for changes to your sector, there’s a whole other world away from the farm that can offer real value back, if you take the time to get there.

When you’ve got livestock and young kids in the mix, finding time to commit to a board or lobbying work can be even more challenging. But with those challenges comes reward, says Adrienne Ivey, rancher from Ituna, Sask.

Last week, Ivey travelled to Ottawa, Ont., for the very first time. Her trip and attendance at the Canadian Federation of Agriculture’s annual general meeting was part of a mentorship program hosted by Agricultural Producers Association of Saskatchewan (APAS) to encourage participation in provincial farm organizations.

Ivey was certainly curious to see how agriculture policy is formed and shaped, especially when it has to include input from farmers with a different perspective. Attending a meeting like this one meant that not only were diverse sectors of agriculture represented, but farmers from every region of Canada also brought their issues forward.

That kind of representation pushes you to get outside your bubble, Ivey says, and there’s so much to learn from hearing out someone else’s perspective.

“Any time you can look around and learn from each other, it’s always worth your time,” she says.

From a brief discussion on what was discussed at the CFA AGM last week, to the importance of having your voice heard at a local and national level, to what Ivey found most memorable about her foray into agriculture politics, tap below to listen:

 

Lyndsey Smith

Lyndsey Smith is a field editor for RealAgriculture. A self-proclaimed agnerd, Lyndsey is passionate about all things farming but is especially thrilled by agronomy and livestock production.

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