Wheat Pete’s Word, March 7: Doppelgängers, volatilization, and learnings from Zambia

Host Peter Johnson brings us highlights and learnings all the way from Zambia in this episode of Wheat Pete’s Word. Then: a rant on “first-world problems”; a grain market alert; seeding clover into wheat; and more.

Have a question you’d like Johnson to address? Or some yield results to send in? Leave him a message at 1-844-540-2014, send him a tweet (@wheatpete), or email him at [email protected]

Find a summary of today’s show topics and times below the audio.

Summary:

  • 00:40 – Highlights and learnings from Zambia.
  • 04:05 – A rant on genetic modification, herbicides and “toxic chemicals.”
  • 05:45 – “For goodness sakes, sell, sell, sell!”
  • 07:05 – Big rains in Ontario — how will this impact winter wheat?
  • 08:05 – Browning leaf tissue from lack of snow cover.
  • 08:35 – Get the clover on that frost.
  • 09:50 – Feedback on roots plugging tiles.
  • 12:10 – Sourcing wheat seed — should I look for wheat outside of dry areas? Should I always source from somewhere else?
  • 13:25 – Understanding volatilization and urea application methods.
  • 15:12 – Why doesn’t strip-till work in soybeans and cereals?
  • 15:40 – Does Wheat Pete have a doppelgänger?
 

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One Comment

Mac Ferguson

Peter, great to see you Monday in Brodhagen. Would you devote 2-4 minutes on the key strip till issues that have been discussed over the winter?

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