Canola School: Fumigation in the fight against clubroot

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When a field is confirmed infected with clubroot, it’s recommended that producers implement (or continue) strict sanitation protocols, crop rotations, and the responsible use of Plasmodiophora brassicae-resistant canola varieties. There may be further options, however, like the use of fumigants traditionally used in horticulture.

“The first fumigant I look at is Vapam, and the Vapam is widely used for vegetable production,” says Sheau-Fang Hwang, plant pathologist with Alberta Agriculture and Forestry, in this Canola School video. “It is a very broad-spectrum fumigant.”

Hwang’s team published findings on the efficacy of Vapam in 2014, after preliminary trials showed a 12-16 fold reduction in primary and secondary infection, and clubroot severity at application rates of 0.4-1.6mL/L of soil.

But there are challenges to using the product, cautions Hwang.

First, it can be cost-prohibitive for large-scale applications.

“I did a little bit of calculation, and it could cost you about $2,000 per hectare — that’s almost like you don’t get any profits at all,” she says, adding that some farmers have seen a number closer to $300 per hectare with better deals, and lower rates.

The other challenge is Vapam handling and application requires special training, and can be a rather difficult product to deal with.

But, for farmers looking to treat small areas like field entrances and hot spots, fumigation might be a good option.

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One thought on “Canola School: Fumigation in the fight against clubroot

  1. there are certainly some low cost processes. we should find that out. constant search should be done.

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