Soybean School: Scout to evaluate your stand and when to go rolling

What’s your strategy when scouting a newly emerged soybean field?

When Agromart Group agronomist Steph Kowalski walks into a soybean field this time of year, the first thing she looks to assess is final emergence and population. “It’s important to know how well we got that seed into the ground,” Kowalski tells RealAgriculture’s Bernard Tobin on this episode of the Soybean School.

“Residue can also be a big problem for soybeans so that’s one of the the things I’m looking at.” She assesses weed control, especially how pre-emerge herbicides are preforming and whether a management plan for weed escapes is required. In this field, Kowalski is also evaluating the optimal timing for rolling soybeans and the potential yield benefits.

Summary

  • “Farming is an outdoor sport and you can have huge variability in your final stand,” says Kowalski. It’s important to calculate your final stand (counts) and compare it to your seeding rate and identify factors such as residue, planter/drill issues, cold soils, and insects that could be impacting the stand.
  • If you are planting soybeans into residue, take a close look at planter/drill performance – there are many options to consider. Should you offset your planter or drill to run between last year’s cornstalks? If you are set up with a planter, should you be using row cleaners to move that residue out of the row spacing?
  • Be aware of the critical weed-free period – emergence to third trifoliate. Take a close look at how pre-emergence herbicides are performing. “With variable and spotty rain this spring we really need to keep track of when we spray these herbicides,” says Kowalski. Most labels require 10 mm to 15 mm of rain within seven days for full activation. “We could see slightly reduced control in lack-of-rainfall areas so get out and scout your weed spectrum and determine a plan of attack if you need one.”
  • If you don’t get a chance to roll your soybeans before emergence, don’t worry. Research from OMAFRA soybean specialist Horst Bohner shows a one to two bushel per acre yield increase for rolling at first and second trifoliate. “Whether you want to roll to push down stones or just make harvest easier, don’t hesitate to roll the beans at these stages in the heat of the day when the plants are malleable – drive on and roll.”

Click here for more Soybean School episodes.

 

Bernard Tobin

Bernard Tobin is Real Agriculture's Ontario Field Editor. AgBern was raised on a dairy farm near St. John's, Newfoundland. For the past two decades, he has specialized in agricultural communications. A Ryerson University journalism grad, he kicked off his career with a seven-year stint as Managing Editor and Field Editor for Farm and Country magazine. He has received six Canadian Farm Writers' Federation awards for journalism excellence. He's also worked for two of Canada's leading agricultural communications firms, providing public relations, branding and strategic marketing. Bern also works for Guelph-based Synthesis Agri-Food Network and talks the Real Dirt on Farming.

Trending

Wheat prices jump into August — This week in the grain markets

This week, winter wheat prices touched a three-year high, but it didn’t last. Chicago SRW wheat prices for September 2018 gained 5 per cent or about 26 cents US/bushel to close at $5.56. While the December 2018 contract was up 5.4 percent — or nearly 30 cents — to finish a tad under $5.80. In…Read more »

Related

Leave a Reply

 

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.