Wheat Pete’s Word, Sept 5: Big yield predictions, gibberella risks, and selling potash

Gibberella ear rot. Photo credit: Lyndsey Smith, 2016

If you’ve heard tell of some record yield estimates out there, let’s all remember that the crop sure isn’t in the bin yet, says Peter Johnson, host of Wheat Pete’s Word. It seems that some of the good spots look GREAT and some of the poor spots are turning out better than anticipated. When it comes to the corn crop, though, remember that now is when a lot of disease shows up!

In this first September episode of the Word, Johnson fields questions from Quebec to Utah to Ontario, too, and mentions at least one alert, one field-nutrient export you may currently underestimate, and why choosing a cereal variety specifically for straw can prove challenging. (Summary continues below)

Have a question you’d like Johnson to address? Or some yield results to send in? Leave him a message at 1-844-540-2014, send him a tweet (@wheatpete), or email him at [email protected]

SUMMARY

  • Where are these sky-high yield predictions come from? Timely rain and ahead of average for heat units, and that makes up for some of the drought damage
  • Edible bean and silage harvest has begun!
  • Giberella in the corn crop — it’s ugly, and it’s out there in spades. Wet silks will do that. Later pollinated will likely be worst off
  • Western bean cutworm damage is low, and gibberella infection through this route is lower
  • If you’re a hog farmer, watch out for fusarium/vomitoxin in the corn crop, so look for 2017 corn (as it was a pretty clean crop) if you can
  • Bottom line on gibberella: DO NOT hit the panic button yet, though!
  • Sudden death and soybean cyst nematode are related. Could it mean changing resistance sources
  • Cover crop oats that look amazing! Roots vs. shoots when it comes to organic matter additions? Hey, don’t forget the potash exports when you’re selling the vegetative parts of the plant. Still plenty of roots and root exudates left if you sell the straw/crop. But remember to replace that potash.
  • Switching from liquid to dry fertilizer program for wheat on clay loam — what should you apply? Not 200 pounds at a time, that’s for sure.
  • Does dry seed-placed vs. liquid seed-placed fertilizer impact winter survival?
  • Question from Utah about wheat date and rate — Hessian fly free day (maybe that’s an issue in Utah, but here in Ontario the bigger issue is the green bridge and viral diseases carried by insects)
  • Out of Western Quebec question about hybrid rye: does it need to go in early? What’s the target seeding rate?
  • Winter barley DOES need to go in early (7-10 days before winter wheat) and 75% of the wheat seeding rate
  • If straw is the goal…is wheat the answer? Depends on the variety. Maybe not. Maybe it’s triticale!
 

RealAgriculture Agronomy Team

A team effort of RealAgriculture videographers and editorial staff to make sure that you have the latest in agronomy information for your farm.

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One Comment

Gregg Ballanger

Pete where are you? Ontario is bursting at the seams which harvest. Don’t be lazy. 3 shows are needed. Hurry up.

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