Film series hopes to demystify today’s agriculture

There was a time that farming was not that mysterious a process. Most farming practices were the same from generation to generation, and the majority of people were involved in agriculture in some way themselves. That has all changed now, and some in the industry feel there is now a need to ‘demystify’ what agriculture is today.

RealAg Radio’s Shaun Haney spoke with Pierre Petelle, president and CEO of CropLife Canada, about a new film series that tackles that very subject. Called Real Farm Lives, CropLife produced the series to help the general public see the real face of agriculture and experience different aspects of the lives of farmers.

“We know that Canadians have a genuine curiosity about where their food comes from, so this Real Farm Lives series really aims to help Canadians better understand and appreciate modern farming practices and the hard work it takes to get that food from the farm to the fork,” Petelle says.

Petelle says they really aimed for transparency and making sure it was the farmers’ voice that came through in the series. “It is not heavily branded ‘Croplife Canada,’ but we’re also not hiding it.” He goes on, “We were very careful to make sure this was genuine. We didn’t script, we didn’t provide any upfront information to these families.”

Petelle says six episodes, highlighting three families have been produced, and one new episode will be released each week for six weeks (two are available now). A new episode will be released each Wednesday until the end of November.

The full interview with Pierre Petelle can be heard below.

You can view the Real Farm Lives series, here.

 

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A team effort of RealAgriculture's videographers and editorial staff to make sure that you have the latest in what is happening in agriculture.

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