Crop Protection Network helps farmers manage disease

Episodes:

Looking for the latest information on a leaf disease invading your farm fields? Want to know how fungicides recommended for control or suppression stack up?

Farmers and crop advisors will find all this and more when they visit cropprotectionnetwork.org, says University of Kentucky plant pathologist Carl Bradley.  The Crop Protection Network (CPN) is a multi-state and international partnership of university and provincial extension specialists, and public and private professionals that provides unbiased, research-based information.

The goal is to communicate relevant information to farmers and agricultural personnel to help with decisions related to protecting field crops. CPN produces individual guides for managing corn, soybean and wheat — available on the website and in printed materials — based on all the research information accumulated by its members, including Canadian pathologists such as OMAFRA’s Albert Tenuta. CPN also expects to extend its information resources to cover insect management in the near future.

Bradley touts timely information sources such as CPN’s fungicide efficacy guides, which are updated annually. He notes that growers can consult the guides online when looking for management advice on new diseases such as tar spot in corn and find efficacy ratings for products that have shown control activity on the disease.

In this interview at the National Farm Machinery Show last month, Bradley and Real Agriculture’s Bernard Tobin also discuss the continuing evolution of fungicides. Bradley notes that many new products have been recently registered and are bringing new chemistry to enhance the fight against disease. He adds that many of the these fungicides have new succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor (SDHI) actives.

Bradley says more SDHI products allow fungicides to carry multiple modes of action that can help reduce the development of fungicide resistance to disease pathogens.

Leave a Reply

 

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.