March means two things in Ontario: maple syrup and red clover.

The weather is working okay for the early spring field work to begin in some areas, but maple syrup season is being interrupted by too-warm temps. That said, the warmer weather has many asking about red clover, early nitrogen, and more, on this week’s Wheat Pete’s Word!

Have a question you’d like Johnson to address or some yield results to send in? Disagree with something he’s said? Leave him a message at 1-888-746-3311, send him a tweet (@wheatpete), or email him at [email protected]

SUMMARY

  • Lloyd Ball, this one is for you. You will be missed.
  • Take the time for your family; they won’t be here forever
  • Red clover going on wheat, ya baby!
  • Maple syrup needs some frosty nights, as much as we love some warmer days
  • Air reel under the combine when harvesting wheat. What?! Well, well, well, this is something fun
  • First year soybeans have some challenges, the specific species of rhizobium inoculant isn’t there
  • Second year soybeans might be better, re: inoculant; but suffer in other ways
  • Why not go soy, wheat/red clover, soy, corn?
  • A little tillage after the soybean harvest, before the winter wheat goes in, suggests better red clover catch (though not seen in trials)
  • Spring things for better red clover catch? Split your N! Too much up front is hurting the clover. Do your fall weed control to avoid spring herbicide application
  • No red clover, because of double cropping beans. What about crimson clover?
  • Hairy vetch could be a consideration
  • Forage oats…red clover can outcompete the oats!
  • Is it too early for oats and alfalfa? Get the oats on, but whoa whoa whoa on the alfalfa (past unifoliate stage they are very susceptible to frost damage)
  • There’s always a risk!
  • N before winter wheat before it greens up does not add yield. Full stop
  • What about early sulphur? Not prone to the same losses as N

Leave a Reply

 

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.