Case IH is introducing new technology and configurations to help producers match planting and product application to their needs.

For model year 2021, Case IH is announcing the new ISO Planter Control for 2000 series Early Riser planters.

The new planter control option fives operators the ability to view high-resolution as-applied planting data in real time. With the AFS Pro 1200 display, the technology will deliver in-cab planter control, which can interact with multiple implements and machines, regardless of manufacturer, says Case IH.

“We’re increasingly hearing how operators with mixed-brand fleets need the ability to control and adjust their 2000 Early Riser planter from any tractor. This ISOBUS-compatible display delivers that solution, along with simple plug-and-play operation,” says David Brennan, Case IH planter marketing manager. “ISO Planter Control is seamlessly integrated into the cab with a single display to simplify operation and minimize cab clutter.”

The company says that with the new interface, run screens can be configured to display coverage, varieties, planter ride, spacing, ground contact, skips, and more.

In addition to the new planter control option, Case IH is also introducing a 90 foot boom option for the FA 1030 air boom applicator for either the Titan 3540 or 4540 floater.

(Case IH/Supplied)

“The FA 1030 air boom applicator is helping operators get more done in tight windows and challenging conditions — and these new configurations and options will help them better optimize their productivity,” says Mark Burns, Case IH application equipment marketing manager. “The new 90-ft. boom option paired with 320 cubic feet of struck capacity enables operators to make the most of their time in the field.”

The FA 1030 offers variable rate product application and left or right boom section control to further optimize product delivery. Operators can select from a range of bin options, including single-double-and triple-bin configurations — spreading up to three products and up to 1200 pounds per acre of total product, at 10 miles per hour.

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