After years of dry to extremely dry conditions in the pulse growing regions of Saskatchewan, it’s unlikely anyone is going to complain about a wet spring. The shift from dry to more average or even wet conditions creates some fantastic yield potential for growers, but it also creates a perfect environment for root rots, including… Read More

Each pulse species requires certain bacteria, usually a rhizobium inoculant, in order for plants to fix their own nitrogen. Once nodules form on the plant roots, those little factories can provide much of the crop’s N needs, but there are several decisions farmers have to make at seeding to ensure excellent nodulation, and there are… Read More

While fungicide resistance evolves similarly to herbicide resistance, it can be more challenging to assess given the patchy nature of disease infection across a field, the decreased incidence of disease in dry years, and the multiple lifecycles some pulse diseases complete in a year. Bethany Wyatt, senior technical service specialist with BASF, says that Group… Read More

Controlling weed populations in fields destined for pulse crops is complicated by a few factors, including pulse sensitivity to carryover, poor early crop competition, and herbicide-resistant problem weeds. Sean McKnight, technical marketing specialist for herbicides with BASF, explains in this Pulse School episode how the concept of herbicide layering is an especially useful one for… Read More

Scientists and plant breeders have their sights set on root rots, given the risk that one in particular — aphanomyces — poses to pea and lentil production in Western Canada and the Northern Plains. Federal funding for a new five-year Pulse Crop Research Cluster, leveraged by funding from farmer check-off organizations, was announced earlier this… Read More

There’s a possible yield benefit for peas following wheat in a crop rotation rather than canola, according to research done through the University of Manitoba. This Pulse School episode features Brodie Erb, MSc student and field technician at the U of M, who has spent the past three years looking at how preceding crop, residue… Read More

Producers have limited means to test for the presence of aphanomyces ahead of the growing season, but some new tools are coming online, literally, to help determine aphanomyces risk. Meagan Reed, agronomy manager with Saskatchewan Pulse Growers, says that growers do have some tools in the toolbox to manage for aphanomyces risk, including rotating away… Read More

Once applied, herbicide active ingredients that land on the soil surface are broken down by soil microbes. Those microbes require moisture and warmth to chew through and neutralize the herbicide. When in-season water is limited, those active ingredients can stay in the soil, sometimes for years. Cory Jacob, acting provincial weed specialist for the Saskatchewan… Read More

Pulse crops are notoriously poor competitors against weeds due to their slow growth in the spring. This makes fall weed control essential for establishing a healthy pulse stand in the following year. According to Lyle Jensen of Agro Plus Inc., there are several key reasons why fall is the preferred time for weed control. First, it… Read More

Pulse crops, for the most part, prefer drier conditions; however, the level of drought in some areas of the Prairies over the past few years has been too much for even them. Following multiple years of drought, it becomes more important for farmers to conduct soil tests ahead of planting pulse crops, such as lentils… Read More

Drought or even just dry conditions can significantly impact a crop’s ability to make use of applied fertilizer. What happens when there’s plenty of nitrogen left in the soil ahead of rotating to pulses? That’s the question being asked in a trial happening across three Saskatchewan sites through the Agri-ARM research network. Mike Brown, agronomy… Read More

Growing a new crop can be tricky for a number of different reasons. There are so many unknowns, and at the end of the day, a farmer needs to know they will make a profit off the crop. Robyne Bowness Davidson, pulse specialist at Lakeland College, has been working with lupins for 20 years. The… Read More

 

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