Author: Brennan Turner

Brennan Turner is originally from Foam Lake, SK, where his family started farming the land in the 1920s. After completing his degree in economics from Yale University and then playing some pro hockey, he spent some time working in finance before starting FarmLead.com, a risk-free, transparent online and mobile grain marketplace (app available for iOS & Android). His weekly column is a summary of his free, daily market note, the FarmLead Breakfast Brief. He can be reached via email ([email protected]) or phone (1-855-332-7653).

What StatsCan report? — This week in the grain markets

Grain markets trended higher to start the first full week of December before giving up some gains in the back half. On Tuesday, the StatsCan report was published, giving some bearish numbers, though the market was fairly relaxed about it. The market also seems fairly relaxed heading into the December World Agricultural Supply and Demands… Read more »

Lessons from history — This week in the grain markets

Grain markets started the month of December in the green, supported by the turning of calendars and a lower U.S. dollar. The decline of the U.S. Greenback was mainly related to a heavy geopolitical risk news day that pressured equity markets. This news included a North Korean missile launch, a new tax bill in the… Read more »

Sideways or boom? — This week in the grain markets

Grain markets this week were fairly muted due to a shortened trading week at the Chicago Board of Trade. While Americans were crushing turkey and NFL football, Chinese import data was published, showing that they bought over 480,000 tonnes of vegetable oils in October — that’s a 78% increase year-over-year. Palm oil prices popped as… Read more »

Weather in the driver’s seat — This week in the grain markets

Grain markets ended Friday in the green. However, for the week, prices were mostly in the red as some benign weather kept the bears in charge. Most eyes are on South America but planting is back up to the normal average now. Corn ended practically where it started, dropping only 0.07%. Oats lost nearly 6%… Read more »

Returning to the average — This week in the grain markets

On Thursday the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) came out with their monthly world agricultural supply and demand estimates (WASDE). Usually, November is a bit of a sleeper month, but given the delayed corn harvest in the U.S., there were some ideas that the USDA might provide the market something in line with the… Read more »

Competing bulls and bears — This week in the grain markets

Grain prices were generally trending higher this week before seeing a sell-off on Friday to erase a fair amount of gains. Simply put, bears became more competitive than bulls. Wheat and corn prices seem eternally rangebound as in the past few weeks they haven’t moved more than a quarter. Corn and soybeans were virtually unchanged… Read more »

Grains squeaking out gains — This week in the grain markets

Grain markets had a mostly down week as a stronger U.S. dollar (up 1.2% for the week) weighed on futures markets. However, with the Canadian dollar dropping 1.45% to below 78 cents USD, this meant cash grain prices in Canada improved a bit, especially in canola, flax, and wheat. While canola futures prices on the… Read more »

Batter up — This week in the grain markets

Grain markets this week generally trended lower as rains in the Southern Hemisphere and harvest progress in North America hung over prices. Bulls continue to take a bat at headlines but rallies continue to face resistance from the size of global grain supplies. Oats and canola were the only winners for the week, with the… Read more »

Good luck for grains — This week in the grain market

Usually Friday the 13th is an unlucky day. For grain prices though, Friday, October the 13th was a good omen. On Friday alone, Chicago soft red winter wheat gained 2.15%, oats gained 1.9%, and corn was up 1.05%. Oats was the big winner of the week, though, up 6.25%. This was followed by soybeans which… Read more »

What change? — This Week in the Grain Markets

Grain markets this week traded sideways again, with weather and some decent trade data outweighing harvest pressures. Corn prices lost 1.55% since last Friday whereas soybeans gained 0.5%. Winter wheat markets were lower as Chicago soft red winter wheat lost 1.05% and Kansas City hard red winter wheat lost 1.3%. The Canadian Dollar lost 0.5%… Read more »

What happened to grain markets this quarter?

This week’s grain markets were largely influenced by that was happening in currency markets and government reports. The Canadian Dollar lost about 1.1% this week but has basically ended where it began September, up just 0.15%. On Wednesday, the Loonie saw it’s largest single day loss in eight months after the Bank of Canada’s governor… Read more »

Trying to find some confidence — This week in the grain market

The agricultural industry this week was impacted by some geopolitical tension. North Korea and U.S. President Trump continue to trade warring words, while in Canada, a battle has started between small businesses and farmers and the Liberal federal government over proposed tax reform. For grain markets, losses were made up for from last week’s bullish… Read more »

Checking in on balance sheets — This week in the grain market

Grain markets continue to shift lower as harvest pressures – namely better-than-expected yields. A stronger Canadian Loonie put pressure on cash prices on the northern side whereas the weaker U.S. dollar has helped offset harvest pressures a bit. For the week, corn lost 0.55% while soybeans gained 0.7%. Canola was just 0.2% lower while oats… Read more »

Who owns all the grain? — This week in the grain market

Grain markets this week were influenced mainly by factors of weather, currency, and harvest pressure. Canola lost 1.4% since last Friday, mainly because of the Canadian Loonie appreciating 1.9% over the same time frame. Oats lost 1.8% while corn and soybeans gained 0.35% and 1.25% respectively. Finally, Minneapolis hard red spring wheat edged up 2.35%,… Read more »

Finally a bullish report, or was it?

Statistics Canada came out with their first production estimates of the 2017 Canadian crop on Thursday, August 31st. For once, they weren’t bearish! 13,300 Canadian farmers were surveyed between July 19th and August 1st on their acres, yield and total production. However, while the numbers below are considered bullish, there has certainly been some healthy… Read more »