Category: Industry Issues

We need to talk about mental health: Michael Landsberg

Canadians know Michael Landsberg best as the brash, quick-witted sports journalist who started his career at the anchor desk on TSN’s Sportsdesk and then enjoyed an 18-year run with his no-holds-barred interview show Off The Record. Today, Landsberg is still talking sports, but he spends much of his time sharing the story of his ongoing… Read more »

Swimming the current of scientific evolution — an interview with Rob Saik

The inaugural BeefTech conference was held in Edmonton this week, where Agri-Trend founder and “outspoken advocate for agriculture” Robert Saik delivered the keynote address. Saik’s presentation focused largely on the metaphor of swimming in a river — we can either swim with the current of scientific evolution, or try to fight against it. In this… Read more »

Debate sparked over SaskWheat director’s endorsement of board candidates

Twitter lit up last week, after a screenshot of a Facebook post was shared showing the vice chair of the Saskatchewan Wheat Development Commission Board (SaskWheat) of Directors endorsing four of the ten candidates running for seats in the current director election. On October 2, Dan Danielson, in a public Facebook post, listed the four… Read more »

Ontario minimum wage hike ‘devastating’ to horticulture producers

In May, Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne announced that the province would see three hikes in general minimum wage over 18 months. The first increase happens this week, as wages move from $11.25/hour to $11.40/hour. Subsequent hikes will occur on January 1 of 2018 and 2019, seeing moves to an even $14.00/hour and $15.00/hour, respectively. The… Read more »

Uncertainty in Canadian pulse industry, as latest fumigation exemption nears end

The latest three-month exemption to India’s rules requiring fumigation of pulse crops is nearing its expiration date, and Canadians are no nearer to an understanding of what, exactly, that might mean. “As of today, we don’t know what India’s policy is going to be for bills of lading that are dated October 1 or later,… Read more »

The case for human intervention in nature

Over the past couple of decades, those who make a profit off of the environment — farmers, ranchers, miners, and loggers — have seen a fair amount of negative publicity. As people involved in some of these industries, we know the negativity isn’t always accurate, and Bruce Vincent with Environomics Incorporated more than agrees. “The… Read more »

U.S. and Canadian beef groups still clamouring for TPP

Even though NAFTA negotiations are underway, TPP is still vitally important if Canada and the US want to expand exports.  President Trump removed the United States from TPP shortly after his inaugaration, which has caused some of the remaining eleven TPP countries to do some soul searching. Canada has been searching for its own identity… Read more »

Farmers taking measures to clean up Ontario water

Producers can, and will, continue asking the age-old rhetorical question about why anyone thinks they are, or would be, insensitive to the environment when (unlike most people) they and their families actually live where they work. And although it’s a valid question, I get a feeling that the way our what’s-in-it-for-me society has evolved, logic… Read more »

Details to be determined on national food policy, says Ag Minister MacAulay

The federal government is moving toward establishing a national food policy that will revolve around four “pillars,” but details on what it will look like beyond that have yet to be determined, according to Agriculture Minister Lawrence MacAulay. The minister launched consultations, including an online survey, on establishing a national food policy in a speech… Read more »

Should politicians talk agriculture on the urban campaign trail?

City dwellers may not have much connection to the farm these days but there’s growing evidence that they value the agri-food industry’s ability to produce high-quality, safe food and create jobs. That’s the conclusion of an opinion poll commissioned by Grassroots Public Affairs. The survey of 676 residents in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) indicates… Read more »

Career opportunities are agriculture’s ticket back into the classroom

Consumers need to know where their food comes from. Why don’t we have more agriculture in the classroom? Those are recurring conversation themes and questions AgScape executive director Colleen Smith encounters every day. They’re challenges the Ontario agriculture industry has been grappling with since the Ag In The Classroom program was launched 25 years ago…. Read more »

The push to end supply management signals waning public support of farming

Over the last few months, the Conservative leadership contest has thrust a highly emotional issue for rural Canada into the spotlight— is supply management worth keeping or not? If you aren’t aware of the issue, one candidate, Maxime Bernier, is looking to eliminate the system. The rest of the field of candidates have said they… Read more »

CBC runs a story smearing University of Saskatchewan professor for alleged ties to Monsanto

As universities encourage researchers to collaborate with industry, activists are looking to discredit academics they declare to be compromised.  This week, an American anti-GMO activist organization, U.S. Right to Know, convinced someone at CBC that University of Saskatchewan professor Dr. Peter Phillips has been compromised by Monsanto. The attack is similar to others carried out by… Read more »

Putting the squeeze on celebrity influence

How powerful is popular culture? It has tremendous influence on much of our daily lives, impacting everything from food choices and diets, to exercise, and what products we buy. Many of these choices our those we make to help our families lead healthy lives. Dr. Timothy Caulfield would like to like to see governments, regulators,… Read more »

Could Investing in Rural Canada Make for Affordable Cities?

We know that housing prices – regardless of whether you buy or rent — are out of sight, especially in Canada’s major cities, and in particular, Toronto, where housing prices have jumped more than 30 per cent in one year. As part of what’s called the Fair Housing Plan, announced Thursday, April 20, Ontario Premier… Read more »