Category: Canola School

Canola School is everything you need to stay informed on the latest Canola market developments. Real Agriculture brings you the most up to date Canola farming information to help increase your yields all season long.

Canola School: Fixing Up Harvest Ruts

Wet conditions at harvest inevitably result in a mess, as heavy combines and grain carts leave their mark in the soft soil. With above normal rainfall extending into harvest in parts of Western Canada, we’re seeing some deep ruts and serious compaction from harvest equipment. “That wheel traffic compaction can go as deep as three… Read more »

Canola School: Taking High Quality Diagnostic Photos

With a smartphone in their pocket, every farmer, farm employee, or agronomist is now also a photographer. The ability to share pictures from the field has dramatically improved how farmers and agronomists communicate and diagnose issues. However, the information gleaned from a cellphone photo can only be as good as the original picture. A poor photo won’t tell… Read more »

Canola School: Tiny Bubbles in the Canopy

If you attended this year’s canolaPALOOZA in Lacombe, you might still be singing Don Ho’s Tiny Bubbles. The 1966 release drifted through the air alongside hundreds, if not thousands, of tiny iridescent soap bubbles. The bubbles — and the hit earworm — were part of a spray demonstration that was organized to help producers visualize spray droplets,… Read more »

Canola School: Making Up for Canola’s Nonexistent Relationship with Mycorrhizae

If the world of soil biology had its own version of Facebook, crops like peas, lentils, corn and flax would be listed as “in a symbiotic relationship” with mycorrhizal fungi. The microscopic organisms help these crops access phosphorus in the soil. Wheat would probably be friends with mycorrhiza, as cereals see some benefit from having… Read more »

Canola School: Moving to Multiple N Applications for Canola

Dry conditions at seeding followed by plenty of rain left some canola growers in Western Canada wondering if their canola had enough nitrogen to reach its yield potential. As a result, there was increased interest in top-dressing N on canola this growing season. As Jack Payne, regional agronomist with Farmers Edge, explains in this Canola… Read more »

Canola School: N Sensing Tech in the Palm of Your Hand

Would your canola crop benefit from a top-dress or rescue application of nitrogen? A tissue test will give you an idea of whether plants are deficient, but you’ll have to wait for results. As Jack Payne explains in this Canola School episode, there are now several versions of in-field sensors that help agronomists and growers assess… Read more »

Canola School: The Rundown on Lygus Bugs and Cabbage Seedpod Weevils

While most canola producers in western Canada are still keeping an eye out for wireworms and cutworms, there are more reasons to scout on the horizon. Those reasons? Cabbage seedpod weevils and lygus bugs. For each species, there are a series of factors that might influence the susceptibility of a given canola crop to infestation…. Read more »

Canola School: Cutting Cleaver Populations with Cultural Control Practices

Herbicides are one tool for managing cleavers in canola, but there are many other “small hammers” in the toolbox as well. Seeding rates, row spacing, control timing, and crop rotation all need to be considered, explains Ian Epp, agronomy specialist with the Canola Council of Canada, in this episode of Canola School. “We can add a… Read more »

Canola School: Where Does Canadian Canola End Up?

Ever wonder where Canadian canola ends up? 90 percent of the canola grown in Canada leaves the country to be processed and/or consumed in almost 50 countries around the world, explains Bruce Jowett, vice-president of market development with the Canola Council of Canada, sharing a rundown of export markets in this Canola School episode. The United… Read more »

Canola School: Supply Crunch Looming for Canola?

Canola supplies will likely be tight leading up to harvest this fall, and could be even tighter in 2017 based on StatsCan estimates, average yields and demand trends. “The market is definitely telling us supplies are not going to be as abundant as what we’ve had over the last few years, and I would say it… Read more »

Canola School: Intercropping Peas and Canola 101

To some growers, it’s an old idea; to others, it’s completely new. The concept of peola — intercropping peas and canola  — has been around in Western Canada for decades, but with new varieties and weed control options, the practice seems to be gaining momentum again. In 2009, the Westman Agricultural Diversification Organization found an attention-grabbing yield… Read more »

Canola School: Making Survival Difficult for Glyphosate-Resistant Kochia

Glyphosate-resistant kochia has started showing up in more of Western Canada, and as with other cases of resistance, it’s becoming evident you can’t rely on a single tool for too long. Minimizing resistant weed populations requires an integrated or diverse approach. The crop itself must help make survival difficult for potentially resistant weed seedlings, explains Rob… Read more »

Canola School: Too Early to Panic Over Dry Soils

With maps of moisture extremes popping up across the prairies, and predictions of another dry year, it’s hard to know what to make of seeding. But, as Murray Hartman, oilseed specialist with Alberta Agriculture and Forestry points out in this episode of the Canola School, there isn’t much sense in panicking. Not yet. Moisture Extremes… Read more »

Canola School: Tips for Understanding Macronutrient Soil Test Results

Parts per million versus pounds per acre. Olsen versus Bray. Nitrogen versus nitrate… Some of the numbers and technical terms on the paper or email you get from the soil test lab are relevant for understanding nutrient availability for your crop and others don’t actually mean much for growing crops Western Canada. So which numbers are meaningful?… Read more »

Canola School: New Canola Disease Found in Six Provinces

Editor’s note: The Canadian verticillium stakeholders committee has decided to call the disease caused by Verticillium longisporum “verticillium stripe” instead of “verticillium wilt.” This story has been updated to reflect the new terminology. The canola industry is in the early stages of understanding what it’s up against with a new fungal disease. Verticillium stripe (previously… Read more »