Category: Canola School

Canola School is everything you need to stay informed on the latest Canola market developments. Real Agriculture brings you the most up to date Canola farming information to help increase your yields all season long.

Canola School: Breeding Better Blackleg Resistance

Seed companies are turning to new sources of resistance to protect canola against blackleg disease, as the pathogen population in Western Canada has adapted over the years. Until recently, most of the varieties marketed as “blackleg resistant” relied on what’s known as the Rlm3 gene, explains Sakaria Liban, pathologist with DL Seeds, in this episode of… Read more »

Canola School: How Low Can You Go? New Thinking on Plant Stand Counts

While the official industry recommendation for an optimal canola plant stand remains 7 to 10 plants per square foot, farmers have cut back on seeding rates to save on seed costs. Not everyone in the canola agronomy world agrees, but some extension agronomists and researchers are suggesting the industry recommendation should also be lowered to acknowledge… Read more »

Canola School: 13 New Strains Serve as Warnings About Clubroot Resistance

The clubroot story in Western Canada continues to be written as researchers are finding additional strains of the pathogen that are capable of overcoming genetic resistance. So far, 13 new variants have been identified since the breakdown of resistance was first confirmed in 2013, explains Stephen Strelkov, plant pathology researcher at the University of Alberta. “We think resistance… Read more »

Canola School: Who is Pushing for Change in Global Markets?

There’s no long-term trend talk of any agriculture commodity sector, it seems, that doesn’t include at least some reference to China. After all, it’s not just a populous country, it’s a huge economic driver and consumer of Canadian agriculture products. Imagine, then, what it would mean to have the Chinese market closed, a market worth… Read more »

Canola School: Babysitting High-Maintenance Canola in the Bin

As if canola harvest hasn’t been hard enough with all the snow and rain, the work won’t end when this crop enters the bin. It’s going to require some babysitting. “Number one when you’re taking off tough grain like this is it’s not ‘put it away and forget it’. It’s a 24-hour job type of thing…. Read more »

Canola School: Harvesting Snow-Bound and Frozen Canola

It might only be the middle of October, but it looks and feels like winter in parts of Western Canada, especially as you move north and west in Alberta and Saskatchewan. Snow and freezing rain have left many canola growers with a helpless feeling as crop that was ready to be harvested is now under… Read more »

Canola School: How Seed Companies Determine Sclerotinia Ratings

Canola seed companies are releasing more varieties with claims they have reduced susceptibility to sclerotinia, but how do they determine those ratings? Coming off a season with high sclerotinia pressure, what does it mean if a variety is labelled as ‘partially resistant’? In 2011, the Western Canadian Canola/Rapeseed Recommending Committee started searching for a test that… Read more »

Canola School: Alleviate Soil Compaction with Biodrilling

A wet harvest has left farmers in many areas of Western Canada considering options for addressing soil compaction. One of the options that’s seen increased interest in recent years is the use of cover crops, specifically radishes, to break up root-restricting compacted soil. “Radishes are a cover crop that are being sold specifically for compaction alleviation. You… Read more »

Canola School: Fixing Up Harvest Ruts

Wet conditions at harvest inevitably result in a mess, as heavy combines and grain carts leave their mark in the soft soil. With above normal rainfall extending into harvest in parts of Western Canada, we’re seeing some deep ruts and serious compaction from harvest equipment. “That wheel traffic compaction can go as deep as three… Read more »

Canola School: Taking High Quality Diagnostic Photos

With a smartphone in their pocket, every farmer, farm employee, or agronomist is now also a photographer. The ability to share pictures from the field has dramatically improved how farmers and agronomists communicate and diagnose issues. However, the information gleaned from a cellphone photo can only be as good as the original picture. A poor photo won’t tell… Read more »

Canola School: Tiny Bubbles in the Canopy

If you attended this year’s canolaPALOOZA in Lacombe, you might still be singing Don Ho’s Tiny Bubbles. The 1966 release drifted through the air alongside hundreds, if not thousands, of tiny iridescent soap bubbles. The bubbles — and the hit earworm — were part of a spray demonstration that was organized to help producers visualize spray droplets,… Read more »

Canola School: Making Up for Canola’s Nonexistent Relationship with Mycorrhizae

If the world of soil biology had its own version of Facebook, crops like peas, lentils, corn and flax would be listed as “in a symbiotic relationship” with mycorrhizal fungi. The microscopic organisms help these crops access phosphorus in the soil. Wheat would probably be friends with mycorrhiza, as cereals see some benefit from having… Read more »

Canola School: Moving to Multiple N Applications for Canola

Dry conditions at seeding followed by plenty of rain left some canola growers in Western Canada wondering if their canola had enough nitrogen to reach its yield potential. As a result, there was increased interest in top-dressing N on canola this growing season. As Jack Payne, regional agronomist with Farmers Edge, explains in this Canola… Read more »

Canola School: N Sensing Tech in the Palm of Your Hand

Would your canola crop benefit from a top-dress or rescue application of nitrogen? A tissue test will give you an idea of whether plants are deficient, but you’ll have to wait for results. As Jack Payne explains in this Canola School episode, there are now several versions of in-field sensors that help agronomists and growers assess… Read more »

Canola School: The Rundown on Lygus Bugs and Cabbage Seedpod Weevils

While most canola producers in western Canada are still keeping an eye out for wireworms and cutworms, there are more reasons to scout on the horizon. Those reasons? Cabbage seedpod weevils and lygus bugs. For each species, there are a series of factors that might influence the susceptibility of a given canola crop to infestation…. Read more »