Category: Canola School

Canola School is everything you need to stay informed on the latest Canola market developments. Real Agriculture brings you the most up to date Canola farming information to help increase your yields all season long.

Canola School: Identifying the new mystery midge

Researchers with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada are in the process of identifying and describing a tiny midge species that was first confirmed in canola fields in parts of Western Canada last year. It’s not swede midge, as was previously thought. This new species belongs to the same Contarinia genus, but is more robust, has hairier… Read more »

Canola School: One cool crop — how canola sequesters carbon and reflects the sun

Canola is a “cool” crop in more ways than one, including how it can have a role in mitigating climate change. “From the point of view of global warming or climate change, canola is different from other crops that we grow commonly, and that is that it produces a lot of residue for every seed… Read more »

Canola School: Should I be booking a clubroot-resistant variety?

As clubroot disease spreads in Western Canadian soil, growers who have yet to see symptoms in their fields have a decision to make: when should they start growing varieties that are marketed as resistant to clubroot? “From the Canola Council’s perspective, ideally, we all start growing clubroot-resistant varieties early. We take a proactive approach and… Read more »

Canola School: Determining the best variety to grow next year

Which clubroot-resistant canola variety with herbicide tolerance trait X is the earliest maturing in your area? What about the highest-yielding blackleg resistant variety with herbicide trait Y? Every year the Canola Council of Canada administers the Canola Performance Trials — a third-party small plot and field scale evaluation of current canola varieties. The program is… Read more »

Canola School: A lesson on moisture conservation and knee-jerk reactions

With memories of combines getting stuck, high disease levels and all the problems that come with excess moisture fresh in many farmers’ minds, the dry conditions through much of Western Canada in 2017 were a sharp reminder of why moisture conservation is fundamental to farming on the prairies. “One of the key learnings from this… Read more »

Canola School: Closing the hole in the phosphorus cycle

Phosphorus is a critical nutrient in farming, but it has also received a lot of negative attention for the impact it can have on water quality. If we consider the path of a single phosphorus molecule, it probably originates in a rock formation in the U.S. or North Africa. From there it becomes fertilizer and… Read more »

Canola School: Scout for blackleg at harvest

The canola pods are almost done filling, if not at full maturity, in many areas of the prairies, and harvest is beginning. We often think of scouting as something we have to do earlier in the season when there are still control options, but don’t always remember the importance of knowing what’s going on in… Read more »

Canola School: Pre-harvest options for your canola crop

It’s the time of year when many producers are thinking about swathing, or looking forward to desiccating and straight cutting their canola crop. Two of the more common options for dry downs on your crop are glyphosate, a slower process but great for cleaning up fields; and diquat, the active ingredient in most registered desiccants…. Read more »

Canola School: Weather aids arrival of diamondback moths

Numbers of diamondback moths have increased in Western Canada over the past couple of weeks, in part due to the dry weather and strong winds. In some areas where the canola is still in late bloom, they are causing a fair amount of damage. Héctor Cárcamo, entomologist with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, says the key to… Read more »

Canola School: Comparing vacuum planter and air seeder results

The ability to precisely place individual seeds in a row, as with corn or soybeans, has led some canola growers to switch from air seeders to vacuum planters. Trials in southern Alberta support the hypothesis that better seed-to-soil contact from using a planter results in improved germination and emergence, says Mike Gretzinger, research manager for… Read more »

Canola School: Considerations for straight cutting as acres surge

“15 to 20 years ago it made me nervous to drive past a canola field waiting to be straight cut. But now…our genetics have improved, our ability to handle that crop, and the size of our combines and ability to handle that crop and harvest it in a timely fashion has gotten much better.” This… Read more »

Canola School: Looking at drift in a different way

When we think of sprayer drift, we usually associate it with wind, but there are other environmental factors that influence where droplets end up. Tom Wolf, spray specialist with Agrimetrix and Sprayers101.com, takes a fun twist on learning more about spray drift in this Canola School video, using…a bubble machine. “The bubbles fly just like… Read more »

Canola School: Following the smooth side — a tip for assessing maturity

When it comes to assessing canola maturity at this time of eyar, it can be tricky to see what’s what, especially when it comes to a thick canola crop. In this Canola School episode, Keith Gabert, agronomy specialist with the Canola Council of Canada, shares a tip for finding the main stem — a trick… Read more »

Canola School: Doing your own field trials through the Ultimate Canola Challenge

“What would happen if we bumped nitrogen rates up by 10 percent? Or vice versa? Should we apply boron? What about foliar product XYZ?…” As a grower, you’re constantly considering different ideas on to get the best return on investment in a given crop, but with all the variables in farming, it’s often difficult to… Read more »

Canola School: Gambling with nitrogen and the weather

Canola crops across the prairies are in many different stages — some are coming out of bloom, and some are still in the window where dribble banding nitrogen could work. When it comes to making nitrogen available to your canola crops, weather plays an imperative role. After all, wet conditions are the reason many acres… Read more »