The Official Grain Grading Guide, developed by the Canadian Grain Commission, lists all kinds of factors influencing the grade of Canadian pulses. From colour to odour, disease to damage, there’s a lot to consider when harvesting grains, and particularly, those incredibly sensitive pulses. Related: Third-Party Grade Could Be Useful In Marketing Crop With Variable Quality In… Read More

Soybean growers in Western Canada and the Northern U.S. have been up early over the last few mornings checking how low temperatures dropped overnight. The thermometer has dipped below the freezing mark in some areas, with damage to soybeans depending on a number of factors, including maturity. As part of this Soybean School West episode, Kristen Podolsky,… Read More

Common beans, or dry beans, are native to South and Central America, but research efforts have been successful in providing varieties suitable for Canadian climates. A remarkably fruitful opportunity for growers, as North Americans tend to consume dry beans more than any other pulse. Research is ongoing, as we learned at the 2014 Select Grower Field Tour… Read More

In mid-July, the University of Saskatchewan, Saskatchewan Pulse Growers and Alberta Pulse Growers hosted the 2014 Select Grower Field Tour. Attendees had the opportunity to see pulse crops in various stages of breeding selection, ask researchers questions about varietal development and taste the fruits of their labours, with an impressive, pulse-themed lunch. Peruse our 2014 Select Grower… Read More

With flash flooding and saturated soils affecting much of the prairie provinces this year, it’s no wonder producers are finding pea crops with serious symptom development. Unfortunately, distinguishing nutrient deficiencies, nodulation issues (read more: Nodulation No-Show? Tips for a Rescue N App) and disease presence from other stress-inducing factors can be incredibly difficult. A few key signs peas may be… Read More

We’re at a critical point in the growing season —  some of Canada’s pulse crops, specifically lentils, are struggling through excess moisture which could send prices higher. At the same time, those crops destined for markets accessed through the south or east shipping corridors are faced with slow movement, even if export demand is steady…. Read More

Any of a number of factors can cause a pulse crop to become nitrogen deficient, particularly issues with inoculant. Using the wrong Rhizobium species, applying inadequate rates or storing bacteria improperly can decrease the likelihood of proper root nodulation. Less controllable factors, like extreme plant stress or inoculant/soil desiccation can also have a huge impact…. Read More

The pea leaf weevil can cause devastating economic losses to both peas and faba beans. Though the adult beetles feed on these crops after overwintering in perennial legumes, it is actually the larvae that cause the greatest damage. Larval feeding occurs on Rhizobium nodules for roughly six weeks. This may limit or completely inhibit nitrogen-fixation… Read More