Category: Soybean Disease, Weeds & Insects

Soybean School: Why are plant leaves turning red?

Cold nighttime temperatures in recent weeks across Ontario are causing soybean plants to shut down. That’s one of the reasons why many growers are seeing oddly coloured leaves throughout their soybean crops. In this Real Agriculture Soybean School episode, Pride Seeds agronomist Dan Foster explains that in many instances the bronze and reddish leaves growers… Read more »

Soybean School: No payback for white mould revenge spraying

White mould is showing up in soybean fields across Ontario, especially in areas that have consistently seen wet weather and moderate temperatures throughout the summer. In this episode of RealAgriculture Soybean School, OMAFRA plant pathologist Albert Tenuta explains that the fungicide timing for optimal control of white mould is as flowers emerge at the R1… Read more »

Soybean School: Pre + post = successful IP weed control

What’s the best herbicide program for food-grade, non-GMO, identity preserved soybeans? It’s a common question OMAFRA weed specialist Mike Cowbrough gets from growers and we have the answer on this edition of RealAgriculture Soybean School. Cowbrough says there’s no magical herbicide that can handle all the challenges food-grade soybeans face during the growing season. But… Read more »

Soybean School: Taking a closer look at soybean aphid thresholds

The combination of increased soybean acres and high soybean aphid pressure on the prairies in 2017 has sparked conversations about thresholds, beneficial insects, and how to decide when spraying is warranted. The economic threshold for soybean aphids in Canada has traditionally been 250 aphids per plant on 80 percent of plants, with the population still… Read more »

Soybean School: Preventing those yellow patches next year

Most of the yellow patches in soybean fields in Western Canada and the northern U.S. have disappeared as the plants have recovered, or turned necrotic and died, but one of the big questions heading into harvest is: what toll did widespread issues with iron deficiency chlorosis (IDC) earlier in the season take on yields? The… Read more »

Soybean School: One-pass vs. two-pass weed control

Should you spray your soybeans once or twice? In this episode of Real Agriculture Soybean School, OMAFRA weed specialist Mike Cowbrough takes a look at how one-pass and two-pass herbicide systems compare. He notes that a one-pass program can offer effective weed control if growers keep soybeans fields weed-free through the third trifoliate stage. But… Read more »

Soybean School: Painted lady caterpillar dines on thistle and soybeans

The painted lady caterpillar, also known as the thistle caterpillar, is typically something pulse growers in Western Canada have seen as a beneficial insect. This is because it feeds on Canada thistle. However, as seen in 2017, the painted lady caterpillar also likes to chew on soybeans, causing leaf damage and potential yield losses. In… Read more »

Soybean School: Getting fungicide timing right

A stretch of sunny, dry weather in Ontario has soybeans on the comeback trail. That also means that soybean fungicide timing is sneaking up on many growers as the crop picks up steam in mid July. In this edition of RealAgriculture Soybean School, BASF agronomist Ken Currah takes a closer look at the soybean fungicide… Read more »

Soybean School: Should you plant now and spray later?

With fields drying out and warming up soybean planting is moving full steam ahead in Ontario. In many cases the spring conditions are dictating that farmers take a ‘plant now, spray later’ approach. It’s an obvious choice, but the challenge for many is how to manage fast-growing, large weeds that can quickly take a bite out… Read more »

Soybean School: Management Tips for Plant 2017

As 2017 soybean planting gets rolling across Ontario, what management considerations should be top of mind for growers? In our planting edition of Real Agriculture Soybean School, we put that question to Pride Seeds market development agronomist Dan Foster. In this episode, Foster explains why he’s excited to see Roundup Ready 2 Xtend soybeans going… Read more »

Soybean School: Keeping Dicamba Application On Target

Growers and custom applicators will need to be vigilant this spring to ensure dicamba herbicide hits targeted, glyphosate-tolerant Xtend soybeans — and then stays put. In Part One of our series on dicamba stewardship, Real Agriculture’s Bernard Tobin and BASF Canada technical development manager Rob Miller discussed how a pre-plant application is the best strategy… Read more »

Soybean School: Pre-plant Application Best Strategy for Dicamba Tolerant Technology

In Canada, hundreds of thousands of acres will be planted to dicamba- and glyphosate-tolerant Xtend soybeans this spring. That means growers and custom applicators will need to be vigilant in their stewardship efforts to ensure dicamba herbicide hits the target when sprayed and stays put. See Related: EU Approves Imports of New Soybean Genetics In… Read more »

Soybean School: What We Learned in 2016

Growing soybeans in Ontario in 2016 was a real nail biter. Even Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs soybean specialist Horst Bohner admits to being pretty nervous as the soybean crop struggled through a dry July. Many farmers were lucky when rains arrived in August, but a good portion of the province –… Read more »

Soybean School: How New Dicamba Performs in Roundup Ready 2 Xtend

Soybean growers will get their first opportunity to grow Roundup Ready 2 Xtend soybeans in 2017. They’ll also get to see how Engenia, BASF’s new dicamba formulation, performs with the new seed technology. In this episode of Real Agriculture’s Soybean School, we travel to BASF’s research farm at Maryhill, Ont., to check out Engenia Roundup… Read more »

Soybean School: Genetics Lead Fight Against Sudden Death Syndrome

2016 was a good year to grow soybean varieties with strong genetic resistance to sudden death syndrome (SDS). Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food, and Rural Affairs plant pathologist Albert Tenuta explains that this season’s cool, wet early growing conditions, which then gave way to drought in many regions of Ontario, helped the disease pack a… Read more »