Category: Seeding WSW

Wheat School: Shedding Pounds Makes Healthier Seeding Rate

Peter Johnson wishes farmers managed wheat more like corn. He admits that corn’s bigger yields and higher profitability creates more interest in intensively managing the crop, but that does not excuse growers from making good, basic wheat management decisions. One thing that drives Real Agriculture’s resident agronomist crazy is wheat growers who seed based on… Read more »

Wheat School: Making a Case for Perennial Wheat

Are you tired of planting wheat every year? What if you only had to plant the crop every four years? If those questions spark your interest, you won’t want to miss this episode of Real Agriculture’s Wheat School featuring Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada research scientist Jamie Larsen. He’s working to develop perennial wheat that would grow… Read more »

Wheat School: How Many of Your Seeds Survived to Become Viable Plants?

How many of the seeds put in the ground by your airseeder or drill will actually emerge and become viable plants? Seedling mortality can vary greatly, but needs to be considered when determining seeding rates, assessing emergence and when planning for next year. A 5 to 10 percent mortality rate is often assumed when calculating… Read more »

Wheat School: To Treat or Not to Treat, Is It a Question?

For some growers, treating wheat seed is a no-brainer, while others still choose to forego a treatment and the input cost that comes with it. So how do you decide? With seeding ramping up for another spring, Pam de Rocquigny, cereal crop specialist with Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Development, joins us in the field… Read more »

Wheat School: Managing Nutrient Needs & Volunteer Weeds — Getting Winter Wheat Off to a Strong Start

With crop insurance deadlines passing, much of this fall’s winter wheat planting in Western Canada is complete. While winter conditions are beyond control, there are some practices that can mitigate the risk of winterkill and help the crop get off to a strong start, both now in fall and following snowmelt in spring. In this… Read more »

Wheat School: Options for Poor Quality Seed Lots — What Can a Seed Treatment Fix?

There’s no shortage of less than stellar wheat out there — the weather near the end of summer and early fall was not kind to harvest or the resulting grain (remember all that snow in September, Alberta?). While some quality parameters aren’t deal breakers and might be managed through bumping seeding rates, others can’t be… Read more »

Wheat School: Yes, YOU Must be Putting Phos Down With Wheat!

Do you put down starter fertilizer with your winter wheat? If not, Peter Johnson, cereal specialist with the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs, wants to know what you’re waiting for. “We’ve done a whole bunch more analysis of the (trial) data…and if you have a low soil test and don’t apply phosphorus… Read more »

Wheat School: The Growing Degree Day Game

Growing Degree Days (GDD) are an indicator of expected crop development based on weather conditions. GDDs are calculated by taking the mean temperature over a day and subtracting a base temperature. For most cereal grains, the base temperature is considered 5 degrees C, as they require around 1200 GDD to reach maturity. GDD = (Tmax + Tmin)… Read more »

Wheat School: Seed Treatment Considerations for Disease & Insect Control

If you’ve already completed your seed test, it’s likely you have an idea of the level of disease present in your wheat seed. With that, and knowledge of pests from previous years, it’s time to make a decision about seed treatment. “Treating wheat seed is an importance insurance step,” says Mitchell Japp of the Saskatchewan… Read more »

Wheat School: What Should We Expect of Hybrid Wheat?

For many farmers, seeing corn production top 200 or 250 bushels an acre simply leaves them wondering, “Why can’t wheat get over 100, 150 bushels an acre?” Winter wheat can, and certainly spring wheat does now and again, but not consistently enough to pull the averages up even into the high 90s for many farms…. Read more »

Wheat School: Seedbed Prep Begins at the Combine

The seed drill does its most precise job if running through uniform residue and soil. While there’s little you can do about soil variability, residue management is well within your power. As Peter Johnson says in this video, start your winter wheat planting pass from the combine by spreading residue uniformly. (Click here to see… Read more »

Wheat School: Essential Fertility Planning for Wheat Production

Side band? Top dress? Add micros or not? When it comes to wheat production many farmers are looking to closely match crop needs with fertilizer applications, but exactly how to meet those needs brings up a host of questions. Never fear, as Peter Johnson, cereal specialist with the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture and Food, is… Read more »

Wheat School: Wheat Seeding Rates for Max Yield — What’s the Ideal?

If you’re still seeding wheat by “about two bushels per acre”, it’s time to revisit your seeding strategy. Not only does the old bushels per acre rule-of-thumb not take into account a targeted plant population (the cornerstone of the crop year), it also ignores seed lot differences of size and weight. While varieties may perform… Read more »

Wheat School: Choosing Water Volumes & Nozzles for Tank-Mix Partners

When considering tank mixes, whether in-crop or pre-seed, most farmers spend most of their time ensuring the products will control what they’re targeting and if there are any re-cropping restrictions. Rightly so, as these are the two most important factors, however how much thought do you give to the water volume and nozzle selection when… Read more »

Wheat School: Early Evaluation of Winter Wheat Stands & Ideal N Application Timing

The ideal set up for winter wheat is plating in mid-September at about half an inch deep with starter fertilizer. Then it rains and the crop grows to three leaves plus one tiller, then gets covered in a cozy blanket of snow, where it stays until it warms up in the spring. Reality, however, often… Read more »