With the rise in gluten-free and low carb dieting, wheat has received a bad rap and developed a nutritional reputation that it doesn’t deserve, says a cereal research scientist with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. Based at the Richardson Centre for Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals in Winnipeg, Dr. Nancy Ames is concerned consumers are not realizing the… Read More

Increasing nitrogen rates can actually prove detrimental if producers don’t also take the time to apply fungicides, says Peter Johnson, cereals specialist with Ontario Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs. That’s because the resulting improvements in canopy can actually increase the potential for disease development. Enter the nitrogen/fungicide duo. “That synergy is so significant,” says Johnson, referring to… Read More

Potentially containing a mycotoxin known as DON (deoxynivalenol), fusarium-affected wheat can be a challenge to market, and a safety hazard to handle. But, new work suggests sorting tactics could help improve sample quality. Rex Newkirk is the vice president of research and innovation at Canadian International Grains Institute (CIGI) and has been heavily involved in looking at how optical… Read More

Successful winter wheat crops depend on the process of vernalization in order to spur the wheat to shift  from vegetative to reproductive growth. The process is initiated by the presence of cold temperatures and, surprising to many, is not dependent on seedling growth. “Wheat’s a pretty interesting crop,” says Peter Johnson, cereal specialist for the… Read More

Following the end of the Canadian Wheat Board’s single desk, there was strong interest in growing wheat varieties from classes other than the traditional Canada Western Red Spring wheat that Canada is known for. There was plenty of talk about producing more high-yielding CPS (Canada Prairie Spring) wheat, but two years later, that buzz seems… Read More

High disease levels have winter wheat growers in Western Canada concerned about the market prospects for the crop. Samples brought to elevators in some areas — especially central Manitoba — have contained up to 20 percent fusarium damaged kernels. Buyers have started discounting grain based on the related potential vomitoxin levels. So where will this… Read More

Cereal leaf beetle was first discovered in Alberta in 2005, with Saskatchewan and Manitoba finding populations shortly thereafter. As its name suggests, the insect prefers to feed on cereals, though it may extend its host range to grasses, even occasionally feeding on corn. Both adults and larvae feed on the leaves in strips between veins, causing a… Read More