Dry atmospheric air contains about 20% oxygen and over 78% nitrogen. Nitrogen, in its molecular, gaseous form (N2(g)) is very stable, and does not react easily with other compounds. In order to be used, then, the coupled nitrogen atoms must first be split. Consider it similar to asking a new couple for help with harvest…. Read More

There are few things more troubling to a farmer than a sickly looking or well-chewed plant. Environmental stress is unavoidable, but determining the correct stress is important if you’re looking to either a) remedy the situation or b) avoid it in the future. Manitoba soybean farmers enjoy relatively few disease and insect pressures, so far,… Read More

The hybridization of crops is one of the first big stepping stones to major advancements in crop yield, as hybrid vigour really does create offspring greater than either of the parents. Hybrid breeding of corn and canola varieties has led to yield jumps in the leaps vs. the incremental gains made through straight crosses. But… Read More

Perhaps I should preface this list with a caveat — the best way to make perfect hay is to ensure it doesn’t get rained on. And now that we’ve all stopped belly-laughing we can get down to the business of making hay in a more realistic setting. I’ve listened to Dr. Dan Undersander, from the… Read More

Top-dressing nitrogen (N) is on the rise across Western Canada for a number of reasons. Farmers are constantly trying to attain higher yields, and applying N after the crop has emerged allows a farmer to put down what he couldn’t with his seeder and manipulate yield or protein (in cereals) accordingly. It is also used… Read More

While winter wheat is a darn hardy crop — just 15 plants per sq. foot growing in the spring can reach a very respectable yield potential — there are times when crops just don’t make it through. The southwest corner of Manitoba is reporting some winter wheat issues, and crop insurance adjusters are out evaluating… Read More

There are few things I love more than the smell of fresh cut hay. The joy of that smell for some comes from the incredible value a high-producing alfalfa field creates. But while alfalfa stands can produce for several years, each winter takes its toll on the crop, and a careful evaluation of production potential… Read More

 

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