Category: Spraying

If grass is green, soybean white mould is keen

Timing a white mould fungicide application in soybeans can be tricky business. The typical recommendation is to spray a first-pass fungicide at the R2 to R2.5 stage. Most Ontario soybean fields, however, are highly variable and can contain plants progressing at different growth rates within the stand. How can you tackle this challenge? BASF technical… Read more »

Fill the heads, protect the quality — the two-pass fungicide plan

Crop input decisions would be made so much easier if only one year’s weather would predict the next. But we know that one dry year doesn’t make a trend, so while 2018 is looking dry in Western Canada will it stay dry for the growing season? Will crop disease be less of a threat because… Read more »

Blackleg risks, management, and a yield loss calculator

There’s this thing about nature — it adapts. Many canola growers are getting a real taste of this in recent years by a slow but steady resurgence of blackleg showing up and stealing yield. For those who think, “hey, we have genetic resistance, didn’t we deal with this already?” read and listen on. Record canola… Read more »

Transport Canada grants certificate for spraying with a drone

The use of drones for spraying cleared a major regulatory milestone last summer, as Transport Canada issued its first approval for commercial spraying with an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), according to the Elie, Manitoba-based company that received the permission. To fly any aircraft — manned or unmanned — for commercial purposes in Canada, you must… Read more »

Soybean School: How wide is your spring burndown window?

If you have weeds pop up prior to planting soybeans you can control them with a burndown herbicide application. But what happens when rain and wind conspire to prevent you from applying a burndown and you have to control weeds after planting? In this episode of the Soybean School, OMAFRA weed control specialist Mike Cowbrough… Read more »

Soybean School: Ontario growers better positioned to manage dicamba

In 2017, many U.S. growers struggled to manage dicamba use with increasing acres of dicamba-tolerant Xtend soybeans. The dicamba story in Ontario, however, was much different, as growers had few issues with managing the marriage of the herbicide and the new trait. In this edition of RealAgriculture Soybean School, OMAFRA weed specialist Mike Cowbrough explains… Read more »

Dutch spraying drone applies up to 250 litres per flight

With the ability to lift up to 300 kilograms into the air, the Drones4Agro quadcopter drone on display in the Multi Tool Trac exhibit at Agritechnica was much larger than the average drone we see on farms today. But with that payload, it can also carry much more than the small camera that most drones… Read more »

Micron Woman and the world of spray droplets

You just finished a great spray day. Your timing and product choice were bang-on, the weather was good, and your sprayer was calibrated. But do you know what happened to the spray once it left the nozzle? The Spray Guys — Jason Deveau and Tom Wolf — find out in this premiere episode of Micron Woman…. Read more »

EPA defines U.S. label changes for dicamba in 2018

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says it has reached a deal with companies selling dicamba to implement new requirements aimed at minimizing the risk of drift damage to neighbouring crops in 2018. The EPA says Monsanto, BASF and DuPont have voluntarily agreed to label changes for “over the top” use of Monsanto’s XtendiMax, BASF’s Engenia and DuPont Pioneer’s FeXapan… Read more »

Monsanto and weed scientists hold frank discussions about dicamba

Monsanto invited several dozen weed scientists and researchers to St. Louis last week to present data and discuss views on what led to off-target movement of dicamba on several million acres of soybeans in the U.S. this year. While the manufacturers of new dicamba formulations, including Monsanto and BASF, have cited improper application and the… Read more »

New residual herbicide tackles resistant weeds

Canadian corn and soybean growers have a new tool to tackle resistant and tough-to-control weeds. Zidua SC, a new Group 15 herbicide from BASF, will be available in 2018. Deven Esqueda, BASF corn and soybeans crop manager, says the herbicide is labelled for use in herbicide-tolerant soybeans and field corn. With the active ingredient pyroxasulfone,… Read more »

Exploding Sprayer Myths: Is more air better for airblast sprayers?

In the year 2017 an indestructible human cyborg sprayer expert is sent from the future to help sprayer operators match airblast sprayer air settings to their crops. As the red smoke clears in the opening scene of the latest episode of Exploding Spray Myths, our cyborg star, OMAFRA’s Jason Deveau, meets human sprayer expert Tom… Read more »

Canola School: Pre-harvest options for your canola crop

It’s the time of year when many producers are thinking about swathing, or looking forward to desiccating and straight cutting their canola crop. Two of the more common options for dry downs on your crop are glyphosate, a slower process but great for cleaning up fields; and diquat, the active ingredient in most registered desiccants…. Read more »

Soybean School: No payback for white mould revenge spraying

White mould is showing up in soybean fields across Ontario, especially in areas that have consistently seen wet weather and moderate temperatures throughout the summer. In this episode of RealAgriculture Soybean School, OMAFRA plant pathologist Albert Tenuta explains that the fungicide timing for optimal control of white mould is as flowers emerge at the R1… Read more »

Soybean School: Pre + post = successful IP weed control

What’s the best herbicide program for food-grade, non-GMO, identity preserved soybeans? It’s a common question OMAFRA weed specialist Mike Cowbrough gets from growers and we have the answer on this edition of RealAgriculture Soybean School. Cowbrough says there’s no magical herbicide that can handle all the challenges food-grade soybeans face during the growing season. But… Read more »