Category: Canola

Canola School: Got pods? It’s time to scout for bertha armyworm

We’re nearly through the annual flight for bertha armyworm, and numbers are certainly concerning in some areas. If you’ve got canola headed in to podding, you need to scout — this nasty pest can cause a lot of damage in a short time. As canola moves past flowering and into podding, bertha armyworm will move from… Read more »

Canola School: How to help beneficial insects help you

There are a lot of bugs on the prairie landscape — most are beneficial, but the few harmful ones tend to get most of the attention. Sometimes it’s important to take a minute to find out who your friends are. There is a battle being waged in your fields, even if you can’t see it…. Read more »

The real value of a local crop walk

There have definitely been some real challenges this growing season across many parts of the Prairies. Although some areas have received adequate moisture, the majority of acres have been under a drier bias when it comes to weather conditions. With this variability comes decision making, but you have to make sure you are getting out… Read more »

Canola School: Waging war on clubroot

With the long list of other things on the radar to scout for in canola, it can be easy to overlook one or two. But one thing that canola producers need to remain ever vigilant about is clubroot — controlling this disease is an all-out battle, and scouting is a key part of planning for… Read more »

Canola School: Dialling in seedbed-safe rates for phosphate

All farmers want to get their crops off to a good start, and the right amount of phosphate gives canola that pop-up effect that farmers just love to see. There is, however, such thing as too much of a good thing. It turns out that although much research has been done on safe rates of… Read more »

Canola School: Here comes the next generation of sclerotinia resistance

Each July canola growers are faced with the difficult question, “Should I or shouldn’t I spray for sclerotinia?” In the more humid parts of Western Canada, sclerotinia is a huge yield robber. It usually strikes on the years when the canola crop has its greatest yield potential, but spraying is expensive and proper timing can… Read more »

BASF to sell Clearfield canola system as a condition for acquiring LibertyLink

The ripple effect from Bayer’s acquisition of Monsanto continues in the canola seed business. Canada’s Competition Bureau says it has approved BASF’s purchase of Bayer’s LibertyLink canola system on the condition that BASF sell its own Clearfield production system for canola. “The Commissioner of Competition concluded that BASF’s acquisition of the Bayer assets would likely… Read more »

Väderstad rolls out 24-row small seed, high-speed planter

With growing interest in using planter technology to improve seed placement in canola, Väderstad has introduced a new 24-row high-speed planter designed specifically for small-seed crops. The Tempo L 24 made its debut at Canada’s Farm Progress Show at Regina, Saskatchewan, last week. “This is the first time we’ve had 24 row units on this style… Read more »

SaskCanola research manager receives recognition

Errin Willenborg, research manager with SaskCanola recently took home some hardware from the Saskatchewan Institute of Agrologists (SIA). Willenborg manages $3 million in investments per year on behalf of Saskatchewan canola growers. “We’re invested in a lot of research in agronomy, and looking at some of the genetics behind diseases in the province. We have… Read more »

Canola School: How much seed is enough and how much is too much?

Seeding rates are always a hot topic, and for good reason. The only thing more expensive than buying and planting too much canola seed is not having enough seed in the ground and losing yield potential. Canola Council of Canada agronomist Ian Epp is often asked, “Can I lower my seeding rate?” as farmers are… Read more »

‘Learn to Lead’ heading into its third year

SaskCanola is working to encourage and train the next generation of farm leaders. Tracy Broughton, policy and producer relations manager for SaskCanola, says that it’s leadership development is key to making sure the baton will be passed to eager and capable hands. With that in mind, SaskCanola is starting to plan the third year of… Read more »

Canola field events promise learning with an element of carnival

Western Canadian canola growers planning to attend one of three over-the-top canola field days being held this summer are in for a real experience. I recently sat down with Tracy Broughton, policy and producer relations manager for SaskCanola, to talk about what farmers can expect from the upcoming canolaPALOOZA event. Farmers can expect the usual… Read more »

Canola School: Can your fans keep up with large bin size?

The average size of a new grain bin in Western Canada has grown dramatically in recent years. 1,650 bushel flat-bottom bins, while still needed in some cases, are turning into relics of the past. “Right now, the average bin going up is around 25,000 bushels,” says Lorne Grieger of the Prairie Agricultural Machinery Institute (PAMI),… Read more »

Canola School: Fertilizer toxicity may cause seedling death in dry conditions

Not only do dry soil conditions hamper seed germination, they also raise the risk of fertilizer toxicity for seedlings after they germinate, especially in a sensitive crop like canola. That means rates of fertilizer placed at seeding last year or the year before might not be safe this year, explains Don Flaten, soil scientist at… Read more »

Monsanto planning to release TruFlex canola in 2019

Monsanto Canada has announced it plans to finally commercialize its TruFlex canola trait in 2019. TruFlex has been approved in Canada and awaiting Chinese import approval since 2012, along with several other canola traits. It’s not clear what or if anything has changed, but Monsanto now says import approval from China “should be granted in… Read more »