Last week, we discussed seeding speed and the need to keep your seeder at an adequate speed to achieve desired productivity but not lose the accuracy required to get the proper plant emergence and stand.  In terms of seeding depth a rule that I was taught long ago is that the smaller the seed, the… Read More

Have you heard of CIGI? Do you know what CIGI does?  Does the Canadian International Grain Institute make a difference for Canadian farmers and industry?  You bet!!! I recently stopped at CIGI’s office in Winnipeg and had a great time learning about what CIGI is and what they do.  I had what I thought was… Read More

This week I attended the Canada Grains Council Meeting and listened to a very interesting day of reports on the market access issues that Canada is facing.  Unless you have been in Phoenix all winter I am sure that you have not missed the whole Triffid flax issue that has thrown a real wrench in… Read More

At the recent Canada Grains council meeting a listened to a full day of discussions around Canada’s market access issues  across all the main crop types.  The recent market access issues with canola are well documented and continue to challenge the countries trade attempts. With 85-95% of Canada’s canola crop getting exported, trade is very… Read More

By Garth Donald, Dynagra So how important is a pre-seed burn off? That question gets asked to me and others in the industry all the time. It can be one of the most important things when it comes to certain weeds and density of weeds. Let€™s start with a favourite of most farmers in Alberta,… Read More

Seeding equipment continues to get larger and larger which allows for more acres to be covered in a day.  Even with the larger equipment some farmers still find it hard to control the speed of the tractor just so they can say that they covered so many acres in a day.  Everyone needs to remember… Read More

Last week we discussed the topic of fusarium.  Based on the popularity of this One of the frequent confusions is that there is actually a difference between fusarium and vomitoxin.   Some people do not understand that you can have fusarium without vomitoxin. Both are issues that are affecting farmers and their ability to market… Read More

As I mentioned two weeks ago, 2010 is the year of indecision and that continues. On Wednesday the USDA released its 2010 acreage forecast and ending stock report.  It is hard to not hear the reports and think that there is a bit of a bearish tone to the all the commodities involved.  For example wheat… Read More

Fusarium is an ugly monster that continues to rear its ugly head across North America.  Some areas are definitely worse than other but the impact is real.  With more tolerant wheat genetics coming every year, farmers are desperate to try and manage this disease in the most proactive ways that they can. Some of the… Read More

For years many farmers just worried about nitrogen and phosphorus but things have changed.  As we have discovered more about the way the plant reacts to different nutrients, farmers look to anyway to increase the overall health and yield of the canola plant.  There seems to be differing opinions on the need for micro nutrients… Read More

By Garth Donald, Dynagra We have to look back in history to understand how seed treatments came to be. Some of the first seed treatment goes as far back to when the first settlers came to North America. This was just by accident that some of the seed bags fell in the salt water and… Read More

So far in 2010, the only decision being made on farms is to be indecisive.  It has been an unbelievable spring of yes…no…maybe…no….yes….i have no idea!!!  Sometimes I wish that farmers had the decisiveness of cattlemen in their unshattered confidence that things will get better and having conviction is allowable. The early cropping favourites in… Read More