If you live on the Prairies, chances are you’ve seen numerous thunderstorms develop. You already know they typically form on hot, humid days. This is because thunderstorms require moisture, a force to move that moisture and an unstable air mass to develop. You’ve also seen the cumulus stage of thunderstorms developing on the horizon, no… Read More

Unlike bertha armyworm, which is discussed here, diamondback moths are quite small and are carried on winds that come up from the south. This makes monitoring and scouting for the pest somewhat more difficult than others, as pests that overwinter have a more easily anticipated emergence timeline. Beyond monitoring, there are some very telling ways… Read More

Thriving in wet, soggy soils (and thus seldom acknowledged as a problem-pathogen in Canada), aphanomyces is difficult to differentiate from other root rot microorganisms based on symptomology alone. Molecular techniques and identification of spores in the lab are the best means of identification, and as of right now, there is no commercial test available for… Read More

The hybridization of crops is one of the first big stepping stones to major advancements in crop yield, as hybrid vigour really does create offspring greater than either of the parents. Hybrid breeding of corn and canola varieties has led to yield jumps in the leaps vs. the incremental gains made through straight crosses. But… Read More

Having trouble deciding whether or not to spray for soybean aphids? Well, you’re in luck: there’s an app for that! In this episode of Soybean School, Tracey Baute, emtomologist with Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs, introduces The Aphid Advisor App, which uses pest and beneficial insect data collected by the user, in addition… Read More

By now you’re fully aware of the importance of monitoring insect pests in your canola. So, you’ve collected and assembled your sweep-net, now what? The standard technique for sweeping is one 180 degree sweep for every quick step through the canola field (accompanied by the odd fall, of course). Sounds simple (and perhaps slightly embarrassing), but… Read More

The wheat midge (Sitodiplosis mosellana) is a pest found in wheat that can have significant impacts on your yields and grain quality. These insects overwinter as larvae and emerge as adults from their pupal stage in late June to early July (typically 600-900 growing degree days (GDD), ask your agronomist how many GDD`s we have… Read More

Have you been keeping an eye on the bertha armyworm monitoring trap numbers in your area? As we crawl closer to mid-July, it’s important to be aware of regional risks, and have a good understanding of proper scouting techniques and spray timing. “You’re going to have your best success spraying at night,” says John Gavloski, provincial entomologist with… Read More

 

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