Category: Pulses

Pulse School: A look at how pulses are faring in dry conditions

Mother Nature has given the prairies many different crop conditions this year, and Saskatchewan is no exception to this rule. For the most part, Saskatchewan pulse growers are seeing very dry conditions, although this has helped keep disease levels down, notes Sherrilyn Phelps, agronomy specialist with Saskatchewan Pulse Growers, in this latest Pulse School episode…. Read more »

Pulse School: Checking up on disease development and nodulation

With variable conditions across the prairies, pulse crop development also varies, but many fields are either in flowering, or beginning to flower. In this Pulse School episode, Robyne Bowness-Davidson, pulse research scientist with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, fills us in on what she’s been seeing so far this season, and what growers should be keeping… Read more »

Pulse School: Fusarium doesn’t just impact your wheat crops

When most producers hear the word “fusarium” they think of fusarium head blight, and how it impacts their wheat crops. Fusarium also attacks pulse crops, but in this situation, it goes after the roots. Fusarium avenaceum is the species that’s commonly associated with root rots in peas. It’s also a fungus that causes fusarium head blight… Read more »

Pulse School: It’s time to scout for ascochyta

When it comes to economic impact, ascochyta — also referred to as mycosphaerella blight — is a serious concern in peas, lentils and chickpeas. In this Pulse School episode, we talk to Nevin Rosaasen, about how to scout for ascochyta, and the importance of timing when it comes to fungicide application. “When you are going out… Read more »

Pulse School: Assessing the culprit(s) causing a root rot problem

For parts of Western Canada, the rain keeps on pouring. Early wet conditions could be conducive to root rot problems in pulses. Fortunately, for three of the four main culprits —rhyzoctonia, fusarium and pythium, the plants will generally grow through the vulnerable early seedling stage if a seed treatment has been applied, notes Robyne Bowness-Davidson, pulse… Read more »

Pulse School: What you need to know about the critical weed free period

Pulse crops tend to not be as competitive as other crops, such as cereals, which is why we refer to it as the critical weed free period early in the growing season. By definition, these are growth stages in the crop that must be kept weed free to prevent yield loss. In this Pulse School episode,… Read more »

Late seeding leaving a tighter window for pulse crops

How late am I still comfortable with putting this seed in the ground? With wet conditions holding things up, the optimal timeframe for seeding pulse crops, especially peas and fababeans, is getting tighter in parts of Saskatchewan and Alberta, leaving some growers asking themselves the above question. Peas, from a strictly maturity perspective, are quite flexible,… Read more »

Wheat-ing out the noise — This Week in the Grain Markets

Grain markets saw a wild ride to start the month of May as the week started out with big concerns about weather before cooler heads prevailed and bullish gains made earlier in the week were reined in. Oats were the big winner, up 8% since last Friday on the futures board on planting delays. Canola… Read more »

Pulse School: Assessing In-Field Tools for Managing Aphanomyces (Do I Have to Wait Six Years?)

Taking a break from peas or lentils for six years is a tall order for fields where aphanomyces has been a problem. Are there in-field options or tools for managing this relatively new disease? Syama Chatterton, pulse crops pathologist with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada in Lethbridge, has been conducting field trials across the prairies over the last two… Read more »

Wheat Pete’s Word, Feb 15: Wheat as a Corn Crop, Crazy Strips, Peduncles, and Buckwheat Cautions

After a week away, Peter Johnson is back for this edition of Wheat Pete’s Word. Maybe it’s the now-on-sale chocolate talking, but this week’s edition is just a little wild, tackling everything from crazy strips, to peduncles, to robot sprayers, to shedding buckwheat, and much more. Learn why you’ve just got to stop seeding wheat… Read more »

Pulse School: Pulse Crop Rotation Options in the Face of Root Rots

Tough to say and even harder to control, aphanomyces has the potential to significantly reduce pea and lentil yields, and can stick around in the soil for an extremely long time. It’s recommended that farmers not plant pea or lentil for five to six years if aphanomyces has been confirmed in a field, but that’s… Read more »

How to Get Canadians to Eat More Pulses

Canadian farmers are world leaders in growing pulses, but Canadian consumers are way behind in actually consuming these good-for-you ingredients. As we wrap up the International Year of Pulses, Shaun Haney sat down with Delaney Seiferling to reflect on not just this last year’s spotlight on the crop, but also significant changes over the last… Read more »

Pulse Growers in Montana and North Dakota Look to Expand Acres by 30% in 2017

With wheat prices slumping, Montana and North Dakota growers are looking for alternatives. The Northern Pulse Growers held their meeting in Great Falls, Montana this week, in conjunction with the Montana Grain Growers annual get-together. The opportunity to diversify crop rotations and make money doing it excited the crowd. Growers in these states are seeing what’s… Read more »

This Week in the Grain Markets — Languishing Ideas

Grain markets got an American Thanksgiving boost as an unexpected update from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) surprised the oilseed complex, with soyoil leading, up 7.4% for the week. Soybeans weren’t far behind as they continue their run, up 5.1%, while canola held on a bit to climb 2.6%. Corn was supported by the EPA… Read more »

New Dry Bean Varieties Poised to Battle Bacterial Blight

New genetics are expected to help dry bean growers fight back against common bacterial blight — the number one foliar disease in beans in Western Canada. Annual dry bean field surveys in Manitoba, Alberta and Saskatchewan show common bacterial blight “is usually quite severe and widespread,” explains Bob Conner, pulse crop pathologist with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC),… Read more »