Category: Soybeans

Growing farm leaders $1 at a time

How do you grow a farm leader? SeCan and their seed customers are doing it one dollar at a time. Entering its fifth year, the SeCan Grow A Leader program has now contributed more than $200,000 to 4-H in Canada. Last month, the company presented a cheque for $64,880 to 4-H, representing $1 from every… Read more »

Taking a closer look at Climate FieldView

Farmers who visited the 2017 Canada’s Outdoor Farm Show (COFS) in Woodstock, Ontario had an opportunity to watch the Climate FieldView  in action in a field scale demo. So how’s it different from other precision agriculture application out there? Owned by The Climate Corporation (a subsidiary of Monsanto), the key to the platform is a device… Read more »

New residual herbicide tackles resistant weeds

Canadian corn and soybean growers have a new tool to tackle resistant and tough-to-control weeds. Zidua SC, a new Group 15 herbicide from BASF, will be available in 2018. Deven Esqueda, BASF corn and soybeans crop manager, says the herbicide is labelled for use in herbicide-tolerant soybeans and field corn. With the active ingredient pyroxasulfone,… Read more »

Soybean School: Why are plant leaves turning red?

Cold nighttime temperatures in recent weeks across Ontario are causing soybean plants to shut down. That’s one of the reasons why many growers are seeing oddly coloured leaves throughout their soybean crops. In this Real Agriculture Soybean School episode, Pride Seeds agronomist Dan Foster explains that in many instances the bronze and reddish leaves growers… Read more »

Soybean rubber compound hitting the road in new Goodyear tires

New tires coming from Goodyear this fall will feature a rubber compound derived from soybeans. Not only is there a sustainability story to using a plant-based ingredient, but engineers with Goodyear found a performance advantage when using tread compounds made with soybean oil: they remained pliable or soft at lower temperatures, while increasing tread life…. Read more »

Soybean School: No payback for white mould revenge spraying

White mould is showing up in soybean fields across Ontario, especially in areas that have consistently seen wet weather and moderate temperatures throughout the summer. In this episode of RealAgriculture Soybean School, OMAFRA plant pathologist Albert Tenuta explains that the fungicide timing for optimal control of white mould is as flowers emerge at the R1… Read more »

Soybean School: Pre + post = successful IP weed control

What’s the best herbicide program for food-grade, non-GMO, identity preserved soybeans? It’s a common question OMAFRA weed specialist Mike Cowbrough gets from growers and we have the answer on this edition of RealAgriculture Soybean School. Cowbrough says there’s no magical herbicide that can handle all the challenges food-grade soybeans face during the growing season. But… Read more »

Soybean School: Taking a closer look at soybean aphid thresholds

The combination of increased soybean acres and high soybean aphid pressure on the prairies in 2017 has sparked conversations about thresholds, beneficial insects, and how to decide when spraying is warranted. The economic threshold for soybean aphids in Canada has traditionally been 250 aphids per plant on 80 percent of plants, with the population still… Read more »

Soybean School: Preventing those yellow patches next year

Most of the yellow patches in soybean fields in Western Canada and the northern U.S. have disappeared as the plants have recovered, or turned necrotic and died, but one of the big questions heading into harvest is: what toll did widespread issues with iron deficiency chlorosis (IDC) earlier in the season take on yields? The… Read more »

Soybean School: One-pass vs. two-pass weed control

Should you spray your soybeans once or twice? In this episode of Real Agriculture Soybean School, OMAFRA weed specialist Mike Cowbrough takes a look at how one-pass and two-pass herbicide systems compare. He notes that a one-pass program can offer effective weed control if growers keep soybeans fields weed-free through the third trifoliate stage. But… Read more »

More pieces needed to solve dicamba drift puzzle

As the dicamba drift situation unfolds in soybean growing areas of North America, with millions of acres affected, there are some serious questions that will need to be answered in the coming months. How extensive was the damage? What were the factors that led to dicamba herbicide ending up in places where it wasn’t supposed… Read more »

Syngenta receives rights to Enlist soybeans and corn

Syngenta plans to sell soybean and corn varieties with the Enlist herbicide tolerance trait after reaching non-exclusive licensing agreements with Dow AgroSciences and M.S. Technologies. The licenses include the Enlist E3 trait for soybeans in Canada, the U.S., and Latin America, and the global rights for the Enlist event in corn. The Enlist weed control… Read more »

Dynamic soybean demand keeps this incoherent market afloat

When crops reach record high acreages on both sides of the border the market should respond negatively to higher supply levels. Increased supply has to be supported with increased demand and that has been definitely the story in soybeans.  Even though the November soybean futures contract (can be seen below) is off earlier highs farmers… Read more »

Soybean School: Painted lady caterpillar dines on thistle and soybeans

The painted lady caterpillar, also known as the thistle caterpillar, is typically something pulse growers in Western Canada have seen as a beneficial insect. This is because it feeds on Canada thistle. However, as seen in 2017, the painted lady caterpillar also likes to chew on soybeans, causing leaf damage and potential yield losses. In… Read more »

Risk versus reward: thinking critically about cover crops

It’s hard to find a farmer these days who doesn’t see some of the benefits cover crops can bring to their operation. From reduced soil erosion to improved soil structure, nutrient recycling, moisture retention and much more – the list of benefits is long and impressive. But how much is too much? Where and when… Read more »