Category: Blackleg

Canola School: Identifying verticillium stripe

Verticillium stripe, also known as verticillium wilt, is a relatively new-to-Canada canola disease. First identified on a research farm in Manitoba in 2014, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) conducted a nation-wide survey to determine the extensiveness of the pathogen in 2015, and found it to be in multiple locations. In this episode of Canola… Read more »

Canola School: Blackleg levels flat, sclerotinia down, and a changing clubroot threat

Every once in a while a group with a real passion for something get a chance to get together and talk about what they care about. If you get to be in room with with them, you can’t help but feel the energy and, most likely, learn something. The Western Forum on Pest Management (WFPM)… Read more »

Canola School: Check seed labels to rotate blackleg resistance

You may notice some new information on canola seed bags this year — a label that lists what type of blackleg resistance the variety contains. We’ll spare you all the quirky names and numbers for the actual genetic resistance, but Dilantha Fernando, with the University of Manitoba, says farmers can use the alphabetical designation of… Read more »

Blackleg risks, management, and a yield loss calculator

There’s this thing about nature — it adapts. Many canola growers are getting a real taste of this in recent years by a slow but steady resurgence of blackleg showing up and stealing yield. For those who think, “hey, we have genetic resistance, didn’t we deal with this already?” read and listen on. Record canola… Read more »

Concerns about canola-on-canola acres rising

As farmers finalize and consider their crop decisions for 2018 with a lot more detail, there are some developing conversations that are creating a bit of a stir among farmers, agronomists and industry. The debate over soybean acres is exciting, but the real concern is canola acres. Canola acres were a record 22.8 million acres… Read more »

Canola School: Blackleg Resistance Gene Labels On the Way

Canola seed in Canada could soon come with a label describing the variety’s blackleg disease resistance package, similar to the labeling system used in Australia. After around four years of discussions between seed companies, researchers, and growers, an agreement-in-principle has been reached on blackleg resistance labeling, says Clint Jurke, agronomy director with the Canola Council of Canada,… Read more »

Canola School: Breeding Better Blackleg Resistance

Seed companies are turning to new sources of resistance to protect canola against blackleg disease, as the pathogen population in Western Canada has adapted over the years. Until recently, most of the varieties marketed as “blackleg resistant” relied on what’s known as the Rlm3 gene, explains Sakaria Liban, pathologist with DL Seeds, in this episode of… Read more »

Canola School: Where Does Canadian Canola End Up?

Ever wonder where Canadian canola ends up? 90 percent of the canola grown in Canada leaves the country to be processed and/or consumed in almost 50 countries around the world, explains Bruce Jowett, vice-president of market development with the Canola Council of Canada, sharing a rundown of export markets in this Canola School episode. The United… Read more »

China Postpones Tighter Canola Dockage Standards — Can Blackleg Concerns Finally Be Resolved?

The Chinese government has agreed to postpone tighter dockage standards on Canadian canola. In February, China indicated a new standard allowing no more than 1 percent foreign material would be implemented on April 1. As Reuters first reported on Tuesday morning, China’s import policy changes have now been postponed until September 1, 2016. The Chinese say… Read more »

Canola School: What Caused Premature Ripening? Tips for End of Season Scouting

While you’re in the field checking canola to see if it’s ready to be cut, or perhaps already swathing or harvesting it, it’s also a good time to assess the toll disease took on your crop. Sclerotinia, blackleg and clubroot can all cause premature ripening, as disease symptoms become more obvious at the end of the season,… Read more »

Canola School: Rotating Blackleg-Resistant Varieties

Rotation is generally a critical part of mitigating any disease resistance problem. When it comes to preventing the breakdown of resistance in blackleg-resistant canola varieties, the first line of defence is an extended crop rotation with non-host crops. Beyond that, growers can also rotate the canola varieties they’re growing, suggests Anastasia Kubinec, oilseed specialist with Manitoba Agriculture,… Read more »

This Cinderella Crop is Beginning to Act Like a Real Princess

It’s rare to find a western Canadian farmer who doesn’t have a tale to tell of the roaring comebacks canola has made in a growing season. Sure, there have been some wrecks — wicked windstorms that flip swaths or hail that leaves nothing but sticks — but the “Cinderella crop” (you’ve heard the song, right?)… Read more »

Blackleg — Underestimated, Misdiagnosed and a Serious Threat to Canola

When it comes to diseases that rob canola yields, blackleg often doesn’t get the credit it deserves. Many farmers underestimate the significance of blackleg, says Bruce McKinnon, an agronomist with Dekalb in Alberta, in the video below. “Blackleg is a powerful disease that seems to be able to adapt to whatever we throw at it. As we’ve tightened… Read more »

Canola School: Determining Disease Impact Before Harvest

With canola swathing underway across Western Canada, now is the time for growers to assess the toll that diseases have taken on the crop. The “what to look for” list at this time includes the main suspects: blackleg, sclerotinia and clubroot. In this episode of the Canola School, Keith Gabert of the Canola Council of… Read more »

Quilt Label Expansion Includes Blackleg Control of Canola

Syngenta Canada’s foliar fungicide, Quilt, has received approval for an expanded label that now includes control of blackleg in canola crops. Quilt contains two actives for dual modes of action, azoxystrobin (Group 11) and propiconazole (Group 3), and is applied at the rosette stage between the second true leaf and bolting (2 to 6 leaf)… Read more »