Category: Blackleg

Canola School: Blackleg Resistance Gene Labels On the Way

Canola seed in Canada could soon come with a label describing the variety’s blackleg disease resistance package, similar to the labeling system used in Australia. After around four years of discussions between seed companies, researchers, and growers, an agreement-in-principle has been reached on blackleg resistance labeling, says Clint Jurke, agronomy director with the Canola Council of Canada,… Read more »

Canola School: Breeding Better Blackleg Resistance

Seed companies are turning to new sources of resistance to protect canola against blackleg disease, as the pathogen population in Western Canada has adapted over the years. Until recently, most of the varieties marketed as “blackleg resistant” relied on what’s known as the Rlm3 gene, explains Sakaria Liban, pathologist with DL Seeds, in this episode of… Read more »

Canola School: Where Does Canadian Canola End Up?

Ever wonder where Canadian canola ends up? 90 percent of the canola grown in Canada leaves the country to be processed and/or consumed in almost 50 countries around the world, explains Bruce Jowett, vice-president of market development with the Canola Council of Canada, sharing a rundown of export markets in this Canola School episode. The United… Read more »

China Postpones Tighter Canola Dockage Standards — Can Blackleg Concerns Finally Be Resolved?

The Chinese government has agreed to postpone tighter dockage standards on Canadian canola. In February, China indicated a new standard allowing no more than 1 percent foreign material would be implemented on April 1. As Reuters first reported on Tuesday morning, China’s import policy changes have now been postponed until September 1, 2016. The Chinese say… Read more »

Canola School: What Caused Premature Ripening? Tips for End of Season Scouting

While you’re in the field checking canola to see if it’s ready to be cut, or perhaps already swathing or harvesting it, it’s also a good time to assess the toll disease took on your crop. Sclerotinia, blackleg and clubroot can all cause premature ripening, as disease symptoms become more obvious at the end of the season,… Read more »

Canola School: Rotating Blackleg-Resistant Varieties

Rotation is generally a critical part of mitigating any disease resistance problem. When it comes to preventing the breakdown of resistance in blackleg-resistant canola varieties, the first line of defence is an extended crop rotation with non-host crops. Beyond that, growers can also rotate the canola varieties they’re growing, suggests Anastasia Kubinec, oilseed specialist with Manitoba Agriculture,… Read more »

This Cinderella Crop is Beginning to Act Like a Real Princess

It’s rare to find a western Canadian farmer who doesn’t have a tale to tell of the roaring comebacks canola has made in a growing season. Sure, there have been some wrecks — wicked windstorms that flip swaths or hail that leaves nothing but sticks — but the “Cinderella crop” (you’ve heard the song, right?)… Read more »

Blackleg — Underestimated, Misdiagnosed and a Serious Threat to Canola

When it comes to diseases that rob canola yields, blackleg often doesn’t get the credit it deserves. Many farmers underestimate the significance of blackleg, says Bruce McKinnon, an agronomist with Dekalb in Alberta, in the video below. “Blackleg is a powerful disease that seems to be able to adapt to whatever we throw at it. As we’ve tightened… Read more »

Canola School: Determining Disease Impact Before Harvest

With canola swathing underway across Western Canada, now is the time for growers to assess the toll that diseases have taken on the crop. The “what to look for” list at this time includes the main suspects: blackleg, sclerotinia and clubroot. In this episode of the Canola School, Keith Gabert of the Canola Council of… Read more »

Quilt Label Expansion Includes Blackleg Control of Canola

Syngenta Canada’s foliar fungicide, Quilt, has received approval for an expanded label that now includes control of blackleg in canola crops. Quilt contains two actives for dual modes of action, azoxystrobin (Group 11) and propiconazole (Group 3), and is applied at the rosette stage between the second true leaf and bolting (2 to 6 leaf)… Read more »

Canola School: I’ve Found Blackleg in my Canola Stubble — Now What?

Is blackleg resistance breaking down in current canola varieties? The only way to really know is to first scout (swath-timing, harvest and post-harvest are all great times to scout) for the disease and confirm infection. Resistant varieties may still become infected, so seeing infected plants in your crop isn’t necessarily cause for alarm, but if… Read more »

Canola School: Lodged, Dead or Thin Canola Stands — Scouting for Blackleg & More

There’s a lot you can learn from late season scouting of canola. Not only is this prime insect feeding time, it’s also when disease development reaches its peak. Prematurely ripened areas in a field should be a giant red flag to any farmer or agronomist. What are you looking for? It could be sclerotinia, blackleg,… Read more »

Why Early Scouting for Blackleg Matters More Than You Think

Here’s a little tidbit for you: if you’re scouting canola at the 2- to 4-leaf stage and spot blackleg lesions it’s already likely too late to spray. What’s more, a fungicide application later in the season is also likely a waste of money and time, even if symptoms are severe, because the yield loss has… Read more »

Canola School: Is it Blackleg? Tips for Identification & Management

Sclerotinia gets so much attention, you’d think it was the only disease canola succumbed to. While there are many reasons to brush up on sclerotinia management, doing so at the expense of watching and managing for blackleg is a recipe for a slow-building disaster. While canola varieties do have resistance to several strains of the… Read more »