Category: Lygus Bugs

Pulse School: Lygus bugs in fababeans

Lygus bugs are known for attacking canola, alfalfa and sunflowers (you can probably blame the lygus for that gross seed), but they can also be a significant pest in fababeans — especially after their canola food source is harvested. In general, lygus bug species like to feed on the reproductive parts of plants. “Similar to… Read more »

Canola School: The Rundown on Lygus Bugs and Cabbage Seedpod Weevils

While most canola producers in western Canada are still keeping an eye out for wireworms and cutworms, there are more reasons to scout on the horizon. Those reasons? Cabbage seedpod weevils and lygus bugs. For each species, there are a series of factors that might influence the susceptibility of a given canola crop to infestation…. Read more »

Canola School: On the Hunt for Lygus Bugs

They’re small, quick, with piercing/sucking mouth parts that can make a real mess of canola seeds — that’s right, we’re talking lygus bugs. As Keith Gabert explains in this Canola School, there are several factors to consider when scouting for lygus bugs. First, environmental conditions like wind or heat can make numbers seem lower than… Read more »

Canola School: Mid-Summer Scouting Reminders

It’s mid-July and that means the canola is blooming! It also means you’re trying to sneak in some down-time at the local fair or at the cabin. And that’s a fantastic plan, says Angela Brackenreed, agronomist with the Canola Council of Canada, but before you go, there are a few things to scout for in… Read more »

Canola School: Lygus Bug Scouting & Control, Plus an Update on Cabbage Seedpod Weevil

The canola crop across Western Canada can be summed up in one word: variable. Ranging from full flower to swathed, the bulk of the crop is creeping through maturity after several weeks of cool summer temperatures. As a late summer push of warm weather descends, farmers need to be vigilant in protecting the turning crop… Read more »

What do Tram Lines Have to do With Insect Management?

What, indeed. If you just read the title and aren’t sure, the short answer is nothing. The longer answer, however, is that tram lines may make scouting for insects easier and more thorough, and thus beneficial. Not convinced? Read on. Some insects are predictably found on the edge of the field — like flea beetles,… Read more »

Pests to Watch Out For In Alberta In 2013

If there’s two things I learned from the GIJOE cartoons in the eighties it’s that 1) GIJOE must have a strict catch and release policy because I don’t recall any members of COBRA being killed and they come back every week. 2) Knowing is half the battle!(they said it at the end of every episode)… Read more »

Canola School – Keep An Eye Out For Late Season Pests

It’s not over till it’s over. That’s the truth behind getting out to scout your canola. Until that crop is off the field and in the bin, you need to be out looking for potential pest problems. Even though canola has an incredible ability to recover, late season pests can still do some damage to… Read more »

FarmTech 2012 – Looking Ahead to Potential Pest Problems In Alberta

Assessing risk is a crucial part of any producer’s pest control strategy. If you don’t know what to look for or how to look for it, you are setting yourself up for some potentially costly problems. That risk assessment starts with a good knowledge of the previous year including hotspots for activity, and overall movement… Read more »

Canola School: Crop Conditions Across the Prairies – Jim Bessel, Canola Council of Canada

The start of the 2011 growing season was challenging to say the least. Wet weather and unseasonably cool conditions in the majority of the west had producers stressed out and wondering if they would get a crop in at all. That was the case in fact in large areas of Saskatchewan and Manitoba. Fast forward… Read more »

Canola School – Lygus Bugs

In this edition of the canola school Matt Stanford of the Canola Council of Canada breaks down the issue of lygus bugs and their impact on the canola crop.  Knowing the correct timing for spraying is very important in terms of lygus bugs.  

Canola School: What's in the Net

Matt Stanford of the Canola Council of Canada takes a close look at what bugs we find in the bug sweep net.  Cabbage seed pod weevils and lygus bugs can cause real havoc on the canola crop and Matt helps you identify them.