Category: Crop Production & CropSphere

Pulse School: What will it take for India to lift tariffs?

India’s government made no attempt to veil the reason for imposing tariffs on pulse crop imports in late 2017. “Cheap imports, if allowed unabated, are likely to adversely affect the interest of the farmers,” said a statement from the Indian government, announcing the 30 percent import duty on lentils and chickpeas in December. The tariffs on… Read more »

5 takeaways from Crop Production Show and CropSphere

Every year in the second week of January, we get the first peek of the year into what the industry, farmers and government are focused on in Saskatoon. This was a great week at Crop Production Show and CropSphere, as Kelvin and I covered the two events on opposite ends of a very cold city… Read more »

Pulse School: What do India’s tariffs mean for pulse markets in 2018?

India’s move to impose prohibitive import tariffs on peas, lentils and chickpeas has left a cloud of uncertainty hanging over the pulse market heading into the 2018 growing season. After back-to-back bumper crops domestically, India implemented a 50 percent tariff on pea imports in November, followed by a 30 percent tariff imposed on lentils and… Read more »

Pulse School: Assessing In-Field Tools for Managing Aphanomyces (Do I Have to Wait Six Years?)

Taking a break from peas or lentils for six years is a tall order for fields where aphanomyces has been a problem. Are there in-field options or tools for managing this relatively new disease? Syama Chatterton, pulse crops pathologist with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada in Lethbridge, has been conducting field trials across the prairies over the last two… Read more »

Kickin’ Tires, Ep 14: Tips for Buying New (to You?) Seeding Equipment

When you look to purchase a new piece of seeding equipment what are your priorities? Is it size, colour, or what is the newest flashiest tech in the marketplace? Do you shop new and used or only one or the other? There are many things to consider. Kickin’ Tires co-hosts Jim Hale and Shaun Haney… Read more »

Unlocking the Secrets to 180 Bushel Barley

Can we push feed and even malt barley varieties to sky-high yields? Steve Larocque, of Beyond Agronomy, has completed a four-year field trial that says yes, but there’s a catch. Inspired by what he saw on a 2010 trip to New Zealand, where feed barley averaged 207 to 210 bushels per acre, Larocque started digging… Read more »

Pulse School: Pulse Crop Rotation Options in the Face of Root Rots

Tough to say and even harder to control, aphanomyces has the potential to significantly reduce pea and lentil yields, and can stick around in the soil for an extremely long time. It’s recommended that farmers not plant pea or lentil for five to six years if aphanomyces has been confirmed in a field, but that’s… Read more »

Trade Critic Ritz Still Expects “Cooler Heads Will Prevail” in Trump White House

Despite the protectionist rhetoric coming from President Trump, the trade critic for the federal Conservatives sounds hopeful — even optimistic — about Canada’s trading relationship with the United States. “It’s fine to say you want to put America first. It’s fine to say you want to create jobs at home, but at the end of… Read more »

Canola School: Blackleg Resistance Gene Labels On the Way

Canola seed in Canada could soon come with a label describing the variety’s blackleg disease resistance package, similar to the labeling system used in Australia. After around four years of discussions between seed companies, researchers, and growers, an agreement-in-principle has been reached on blackleg resistance labeling, says Clint Jurke, agronomy director with the Canola Council of Canada,… Read more »

Canola Council President Readies for Move to Grain Commission

The Canola Council of Canada has started its search for a new president, following the announcement of Patti Miller’s upcoming departure. Canola Council president since 2012, Miller has been appointed chief commissioner of the Canadian Grain Commission, starting February 13. She sat down with us at CropSphere in Saskatoon last week to reflect on her… Read more »

David Frum’s Advice for the Prime Minister on Dealing with Trump

As Donald Trump takes office in the United States, questions abound regarding the impact of his promised economic, environmental, foreign, and trade policies. There’s optimism in the agricultural regions of the U.S, as the president-elect has promised a major reduction of government agency regulation. The American people wanted something different in Washington and that is what they appear… Read more »

More Customers Searching For Oats Grown Without Glyphosate

Food companies and millers are knocking on grain buyers’ doors looking for oats that have been grown without an application of glyphosate. Demand for “glyphosate free” oats has ramped up over the last few months, says Kenric Exner, merchandising manager with Viterra. “We’re starting to see more end-users in the U.S. ask if it’s possible…. Read more »

SaskWheat Board Decides Against Joining Cereals Canada

The board of directors for the Saskatchewan Wheat Development Commission has decided against joining Cereals Canada, despite a motion from its members to take a seat at the table of the national industry organization. Representing the country’s largest cereal crop-producing province, the Saskatchewan wheat group is notably absent from the list of members in Cereals… Read more »

Making a Lasting Contribution: Dr. Keith Downey

When it comes to making an impact or contribution to agriculture, there are few who can compare to the “father of canola.” Dr. Keith Downey, long-time Agriculture Canada scientist in Saskatoon, worked together with Dr. Baldur Stefansson at the University of Manitoba in the early 1970s to develop canola. As part of SaskCanola’s 25th anniversary… Read more »

Western Canadian Farmers Keep Fingers Crossed on Open Spring — Drew Lerner

The 2016 harvest seems difficult to forget but it’s time to forget and focus on the spring that lies ahead. It’s bitterly cold across the west this week so it’s hard to think about spring weather, but for anyone that has crop left out in the field you are definitely hoping for an open, dry… Read more »