Category: Uncategorized

Take a closer look – it may be waterhemp

Waterhemp has set down roots across Ontario, from Essex and Lambton County, and reports indicate it may have migrated as far east as Quebec. Controlling the invader poses several challenges for growers, says BASF agronomist Richard Anderson. The first problem is a high level of herbicide resistance. Some waterhemp is resistant to up to three… Read more »

Keeping cover crops out of tile drains

Will the growth of cover crops lead to an explosion of plugged tile drains? According to Ohio State professor and farm drainage specialist Dr. Larry Brown, there’s little evidence to suggest that cover crops are going to cause drainage headaches for farmers. At the recent Ontario Certified Crop Advisors annual meeting, Brown says he often gets… Read more »

Corn School: Doing the math on multi-hybrid variable rate planting

Many Ontario corn fields have high levels of variability; soil profiles can change from sand to highly productive loam in a matter of footsteps. One way to tackle this variability is to identify management zones in the field and plant multiple hybrids at variable rates. In this episode of RealAgriculture Corn School, we catch up… Read more »

Do we really need to double food production by 2050?

If you’ve been attending agricultural and food conferences over the last decade you’ve likely heard countless references to “feed the 9 billion” or to double production by 2050 to meet the appetite of a growing global population. Is it time we revisited this oft-cited food prediction? Penn State University’s Mitch Hunter thinks so. Hunter and… Read more »

Wheat School: ‘Real’ Wheat Farmers — Hugh Dietrich

Peter Johnson is back with another episode in our ‘Real’ Wheat Farmers series. This time our RealAgriculture’s resident agronomist is gleaning management tips from Hugh Dietrich who farms with his family at Lucan, Ontario. Dietrich’s advice for Johnson starts with the need to put phosphorus down with wheat in the fall. Tile drainage is also a… Read more »

Soybean School: Investment needed to fend off nematodes

Soybean cyst nematode (SCN) is the leading cause of yield loss for the oilseed crop across North America. And unless a new source of resistance is found to fend off the pest, growers can expect to see SCN gobble up an increasing percentage of their yield in the years ahead. That was the message delivered… Read more »

Corn School: Using your drone to make better management decisions

Recent advances in the availability and quality of satellite imagery is providing powerful in-season management insights for corn growers. Many growers feel it’s no longer necessary to fly their own drone to capture aerial images of their fields. They can simply rely on a growing number of agronomic services to scout their crop using drone… Read more »

To January we go! — This week in the grain market

Grain markets this week headed mostly lower on some bigger production numbers. The big news in outside markets was that the U.S. Federal Reserve bumped their interest rate up by 25 basis points (or 0.25%). It’s expected that the Fed will raise rates again another three times in 2018. However, there are some who think… Read more »

Dairy School: Limiting mould and mycotoxin problems in your herd

Mycotoxin and mould growth in dairy feed can lead to lower milk production, poor animal health and reduced profits. This impact on production is not a new discovery for dairy producers, but there certainly is a growing awareness of the problem, says North Carolina State University professor emeritus Dr. Lon Whitlow. “A large part of it… Read more »

Ontario farmers experimenting with world crops

Six years ago, University of Guelph researcher Glen Filson determined that some world crops —such as okra and amaranth — could potentially be grown in Ontario, providing a huge import replacement opportunity for the province’s farmers. He estimated the then-called “ethnic vegetables” represented a $60 million-plus per month market in the Greater Toronto Area alone…. Read more »

Rancher pleads guilty to 18 charges in stolen farm equipment case

A Saskatchewan rancher has pleaded guilty to possession of stolen property after police seized $1.2 million worth of stolen farm equipment last year, including tractors, balers, and trucks. 39 year old Iain Stables was originally facing 29 charges, and as of Monday, has pleaded guilty to 18 of those. The charges stem from a search… Read more »

Canola School: Pre-harvest options for your canola crop

It’s the time of year when many producers are thinking about swathing, or looking forward to desiccating and straight cutting their canola crop. Two of the more common options for dry downs on your crop are glyphosate, a slower process but great for cleaning up fields; and diquat, the active ingredient in most registered desiccants…. Read more »

Corn School: Could 2017 be another vomitoxin year?

A late-maturing crop, difficult environmental conditions, significant insect pressure and potential for late-season leaf disease…although too early to tell – this growing list of factors could lead to another year of high vomitoxin levels in the Ontario corn crop. In this episode of RealAgriculture Corn School, OMAFRA plant pathologist Albert Tenuta takes a look at the… Read more »

Tillage ‘Earthquakes’ and What Farmers Can Learn From a Forest

Mike Dorion calls himself ‘the compost kid’ and he believes farmers should think about their fields like he does his garden. The founder of Calgary-based Living Soil Solutions doesn’t suggest cash crop farmers use tea leaves to improve soil health, but he does preach the benefits of reducing tillage, banking organic matter to help increase… Read more »

Quiet Dryer Cuts Noise by Half

If you’re looking for a portable grain dryer that purrs like a kitten, take a look at the new GSI Quiet Dryer. GSI rolled out the dryer at the 2017 National Farm Machinery Show in Louisville, Kentucky, last week. In the video below, Jarod Wendt, GSI grain conditioning engineering manager, explains that a new fan… Read more »